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Waste, Fraud & Abuse

Todd Chrisley, left, and his wife, Julie Chrisley, pose for photos at the 52nd annual Academy of Country Music Awards on April 2, 2017, in Las Vegas. Todd and Julie Chrisley were driven by greed as they engaged in an extensive bank fraud scheme and then hid their wealth from tax authorities while flaunting their lavish lifestyle, federal prosecutors said, arguing the reality television stars should receive lengthy prison sentences. They were found guilty on federal charges in June and are set to be sentenced by U.S. District Judge Eleanor Ross in a hearing that begins Monday, Nov. 21. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

Reality TV stars Todd and Julie Chrisley to be sentenced

- Associated Press

Todd and Julie Chrisley were driven by greed as they engaged in an extensive bank fraud scheme and then hid their wealth from tax authorities while flaunting their lavish lifestyle, federal prosecutors said, arguing the reality television stars should receive lengthy prison sentences.

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Trump Organization's former Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg arrives to the courtroom in New York, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022. (AP Photo/Yuki Iwamura)

Trump Org.'s longtime CFO chokes up, says he betrayed trust

- Associated Press

Donald Trump's longtime finance chief choked up on the witness stand Thursday, saying he betrayed the Trump family's trust by scheming to dodge taxes on $1.7 million in company-paid perks, including a Manhattan apartment and luxury cars.

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes arrives at federal court in San Jose, Calif., on Oct. 17, 2022. A federal judge on Friday, Nov. 18, will decide whether Holmes should serve a lengthy prison sentence for duping investors and endangering patients while peddling a bogus blood-testing technology. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

Elizabeth Holmes faces judgment day for her Theranos crimes

- Associated Press

A federal judge on Friday will decide whether disgraced Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes should serve a lengthy prison sentence for duping investors and endangering patients while peddling a bogus blood-testing technology.

Former film producer Harvey Weinstein appears in court at the Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center in Los Angeles, Calif., on Oct. 4 2022. Opening statements are set to begin Monday in the disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein's Los Angeles rape and sexual assault trial. Weinstein is already serving a 23-year-old sentence for a conviction in New York. (Etienne Laurent/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Judge drops 4 of 11 counts against Harvey Weinstein at trial

- Associated Press

The judge at the Los Angeles trial of Harvey Weinstein dropped four of the 11 sexual assault charges against the movie mogul Tuesday after prosecutors said they would not proceed with the counts involving one of his accusers.

David DePape is shown in Berkeley, Calif., on Dec. 13, 2013. DePape, the man police said they witnessed swinging a hammer at U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband, pleaded not guilty Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022, on federal charges of attempting to kidnap a federal official and assaulting the family member of a federal official. DePape, appearing in orange clothes without handcuffs, was assigned a public defender who entered the plea on his behalf during a brief court appearance. (Michael Short/San Francisco Chronicle via AP, File)

Paul Pelosi attack suspect pleads not guilty to federal charges

- Associated Press

A man accused in last month's attack on U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband pleaded not guilty Tuesday to federal charges of attempting to kidnap a federal official and assaulting a federal official's family member.

This image contained in a court filing by the Department of Justice on Aug. 30, 2022, and partially redacted by the source, shows a photo of documents seized during the Aug. 8 FBI search of former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate. (Department of Justice via AP, File)

DOJ says Trump must verify documents seized from Mar-a-Lago

- The Washington Times

The Justice Department urged a federal judge to force former President Donald Trump to confirm whether the FBI's list of classified materials and other documents seized in the raid of his South Florida home is correct before an independent arbitrator decides whether any of the materials should be off-limits to federal prosecutors.