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Transportation & Infrastructure

Coverage of the Department of Transportation and everything related to the nation's infrastructure.

In this Jan. 19, 2017, file photo Martin Winterkorn, former CEO of the German car manufacturer Volkswagen, arrives for a questioning at an investigation committee of the German federal parliament in Berlin, Germany. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, file)

Martin Winterkorn, former Volkswagen CEO, charged with fraud in Germany

- Associated Press

German prosecutors have indicted former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn and four others on charges of fraud and unfair competition, saying he failed to prevent the manipulation of engine software that let Volkswagen cars cheat on diesel emission tests.

In this March 14, 2019, file photo Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks before unveiling the Model Y at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, Calif. A federal judge will hear oral arguments Thursday, April 4, about whether Tesla CEO Elon Musk should be held in contempt of court for violating an agreement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

As Tesla heads to court, shares fall as deliveries slow

Associated Press

A federal judge will hear oral arguments Thursday about whether Tesla CEO Elon Musk should be held in contempt of court for violating an agreement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Crew of doomed Ethiopia jet followed procedures: Report

- Associated Press

The crew of the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed shortly after takeoff last month performed all of the procedures recommended by Boeing when the plane started to nose dive but could not save it, according to a preliminary report released Thursday by Ethiopia’s government.

China’s construction binge spreads to Americas, rattles U.S.

- Associated Press

China’s expansion in Latin America of its Belt and Road initiative to build ports and other trade-related facilities is stirring alarm in Washington over Beijing’s ambitions in a region that American leaders since the 19th century have seen as off-limits to other powers.

TSA’s social media highlight weird stuff in travelers’ bags

- Associated Press

David Johnston stands over a table full of peculiar items confiscated at Dulles International Airport: A glittery clutch with brass knuckles as a clasp. A perfume bottle shaped like a grenade. A rusted circular saw blade. A pocket-sized pitchfork.

U.S. infrastructure is vulnerable to devastating electromagnetic pulse attacks. (Associated Press/File)

Trump orders feds to prep for EMP attack

President Trump has ordered federal government agencies to harden the nation’s infrastructure against potentially devastating attacks by a nuclear-bomb-produced electromagnetic pulse, or EMP.

This June 12, 2018, file photo shows the Uber app on a phone in New York. Ride-hailing service Uber announced on Tuesday, March 26, 2019, it has acquired its Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion, making it the largest-ever technology purchase in the region. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Uber acquires Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion

- Associated Press

Ride-hailing service Uber announced on Tuesday it has acquired Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion, giving the San Francisco-based firm the commanding edge in a region with a large, young, tech-savvy population.

This Friday, June 19, 2015, file photo shows the Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration building, in Washington. For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "Designee Program," is too cozy as company employees do work for an agency charged with keeping the skies safe while being paid by an industry that the FAA is regulating. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

FAA’s close ties to Boeing questioned after 2 deadly crashes

- Associated Press

For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled.

Foreign investigators examine wreckage at the scene where the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed shortly after takeoff on Sunday killing all 157 on board, near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, in Ethiopia Tuesday, March 12, 2019. Ethiopian Airlines had issued no new updates on the crash as of late afternoon Tuesday as families around the world waited for answers, while a global team of investigators began picking through the rural crash site. (AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene)

Ethiopia to send plane’s black box abroad, as grief grows

- Associated Press

The black box from the Boeing jet that crashed and killed all 157 people on board will be sent overseas for analysis but no country has been chosen, an Ethiopian Airlines spokesman said Wednesday, as much of the world grounded or barred the plane model and grieving families arrived at the disaster site.

In this photo dated November 12, 2018, the actual Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 - Max 8 plane, that crashed Sunday, March 10, 2019, shortly after take-off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, shown as it lands at Seattle Boeing Field King County International airport, USA. U.S. aviation experts on Tuesday, March 12, 2019, joined the investigation into the crash of this Ethiopian Airlines jetliner that killed 157 people, as questions grow about the new Boeing plane involved in the crash. (AP Photo/Preston Fiedler)

U.S. joins Ethiopian-led investigation at Boeing crash site

- Associated Press

U.S. aviation experts on Tuesday joined a global investigation into the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner that killed 157 people, as a growing number of airlines grounded the new Boeing plane involved in the crash.

This undated photo provided by Carleton University shows Pius Adesanmi. Adesanmi, a Nigerian professor with Carleton University in Ottowa, Canada, was one of the victims who died Sunday, March 10, 2019, when an Ehtiopian Airlines jet crashed shortly after takeoff in Ethiopia. (Josh Hotz/Courtesy of Carleton University via AP)

Ethiopian crash victims were aid workers, doctors, students

Associated Press

Three Austrian physicians. The co-founder of an international aid organization. A career ambassador. The wife and children of a Slovak legislator. A Nigerian-born Canadian college professor, author and satirist. They were all among the 157 people from 35 countries who died Sunday morning when an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8 jetliner crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa en route to Nairobi, Kenya. Here are some of their stories.

The Boeing logo appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange before the opening bell, Monday, March 11, 2019. Boeing shares were predicted to fall at the open on Wall Street after the crash Sunday of a 737 Max 8 plane in Ethiopia that killed all 157 people aboard. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Boeing’s stock takes a hit as more Max 8 planes are grounded

- Associated Press

Boeing’s stock plunged Monday as the list of countries and airlines grounding the Boeing 737 Max 8 planes continued to grow the day after one crashed in Ethiopia, killing all 157 people on board.

In this Feb. 6, 2014, file photo, an Amtrak logo is seen on a train at 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Amtrak train stuck in Oregon for more than a day is moving

Associated Press

Passengers stranded on an Amtrak train for more than a day in a remote and snowed-in part of Oregon said the train was moving again Tuesday after it got stuck when it hit a tree that fell on the tracks.

This Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015, file photo, shows the reconstructed wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, put on display during a press conference in Gilze-Rijen, central Netherlands. Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 broke up high over Eastern Ukraine killing all 298 people on board. A Dutch safety watchdog says airlines around the world need more and better information to make risk assessments about flying over conflict zones. The Dutch Safety Board issued a report Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, following up on its publication in 2015 of a probe into the cause of the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over war-ravaged eastern Ukraine on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

Airlines need better info before flying over conflict zones

- Associated Press

More than four years after a Malaysian passenger jet was shot down over conflict-ravaged eastern Ukraine, airlines around the world still need more and better information to make risk assessments about flying over war zones, a Dutch safety watchdog said Thursday.