- The Washington Times - Monday, June 22, 2009

DIPLOMATIC TRAFFIC

Foreign visitors in Washington this week:

Monday

Georgian Foreign Minister Grigol Vashadze, who joins Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the meeting of the U.S.-Georgia Charter on Strategic Partnership. They hold a 1:30 p.m. news conference at the State Department. On Tuesday, Mr. Vashadze addresses the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace on the political conditions in his region and on relations with the United States. He is accompanied by a delegation that includes First Deputy Foreign Minister George Bokeria.

Mayor Antonio Ledezma of Caracas, Venezuela, and a member of the political opposition to President Hugo Chavez. He discusses political conditions in Venezuela in a briefing at the Inter-American Dialogue.

Zalman Shoval, a former Israeli ambassador to the United States and now adviser to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He addresses the United States Institute of Peace on prospects for a settlement in the Middle East.

Mei Zhaorong, a former Chinese ambassador to Germany and now vice chairman of the China Institute for International Strategic Studies. He discusses the global financial crisis in a briefing hosted by the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Dr. Brian Brink of South Africa, chairman of the board of the International Women’s Health Coalition. He discusses the fight against AIDS in southern Africa at a forum sponsored by the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the Global Health Policy Center.

Michela Wrong, author of “It’s Our Turn to Eat: The Story of a Kenyan Whistle-Blower,” discusses corruption in her native Kenya in a briefing at the Cato Institute.

Defense Minister Crispus Kiyonga of Uganda; Luis Moreno-Ocampo, prosecutor for the International Criminal Court; Ruhakana Rugunda, Uganda’s ambassador to the United Nations. They discuss the plight of child soldiers forced into the Lord’s Resistance Army, which has terrorized Central and East Africa for 23 years, in a two-day symposium organized by Invisible Children at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

Tuesday

President Michelle Bachelet of Chile, who addresses the U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Chile’s economic and trade policies. She is accompanied by Foreign Minister Mariano Fernandez, Finance Minister Andres Velasco, Energy Minister Marcelo Tokman and Rafael Guilisasti, president of Chile’s Confederation for Production and Commerce. She also addresses the Brookings Institution.

Wednesday

Antonio Maria Costa, under-secretary-general of the United Nations and executive director of the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime. He holds a 10 a.m. news conference at the National Press Club to present the 2009 World Drug Report.

Andrei Piontkovsky, executive director of the Strategic Studies Center in Moscow. He addresses the Hudson Institute on the July 6-8 Moscow summit between President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev.

Rhodri Morgan, Britain’s first minister for Wales, who attends the opening of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, which features the British region this year.

Thursday

Boris Nemtsov, a former deputy prime minister of Russia and co-founder of the political opposition movement, the Union of Right Forces and Solidarnost. He addresses the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace on prospects for the U.S.-Russia summit.

Gulnur Aybet, a lecturer in international relations at Britain’s University of Kent at Canterbury, who discusses political reform in Turkey at a forum sponsored by the Southeast Europe Project of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

• Call Embassy Row at 202/636-3297, fax 202/832-7278 or e-mail jmorrison @washingtontimes.com.


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