- Associated Press - Wednesday, April 25, 2012

RENO, NEV. (AP) - Scientists say a giant fireball that exploded in daylight over California’s Central Valley over the weekend was a rare phenomenon and much larger than most meteors.

Bill Cooke, a specialist in meteors at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., estimates the flaming object was about the size of a minivan.

It was seen from Sacramento to Las Vegas and in parts of northern Nevada as it entered the atmosphere with a loud “boom” about 8 a.m. Sunday.

Cooke says its disintegration probably released energy equivalent to a 5-kiloton explosion. That’s a third the size of the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, at the end of World War II.

NASA experts say fireballs that big occur about once a year but mostly go unseen over oceans or uninhabited areas.

Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times is switching its third-party commenting system from Disqus to Spot.IM. You will need to either create an account with Spot.im or if you wish to use your Disqus account look under the Conversation for the link "Have a Disqus Account?". Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide