- The Washington Times - Friday, August 9, 2013


I recently began reading Mark Leibovich’s “This Town,” which discusses how obsessed members of the Washington elite are with themselves. Sure enough, I came across a familiar name, Terry McAuliffe (or “the Macker,” as he likes to be called among his Beltway friends), the political fundraiser who wants to be Virginia’s next governor.

What specifically appalled me was the part of the book discussing Mr. McAuliffe’s so-called business investment, GreenTech Automotive, the “green” car company he opened in Mississippi, of all places. At one point, Mr. Leibovitch writes that this company’s story “is a monument to the power of a politically connected company,” and that Mr. McAuliffe used his political connections “to secure a package of tax and price incentives” in order to build the now-failed business.

It says a lot about Mr. McAuliffe’s character that when he had the opportunity to bring jobs to Virginia, he turned his back on us for the best deal his crony connections could get him. No amount of explanation can erase that simple fact.

So when we go to the polls in November, we should do to Mr. McAuliffe what he has already done to the people of Virginia: Just say no.


Boyce, Va.

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