- Associated Press - Saturday, April 19, 2014
School food service workers learn healthy recipes

DE PERE, Wis. (AP) - A Wisconsin chef is teaching school food service workers in the Green Bay area the art of preparing healthy meals from scratch.

The Green Bay Press-Gazette Media reports (https://gbpg.net/1jlCZzchttps://gbpg.net/1jlCZzc ) that about 50 area workers recently attended Monique Hooker’s workshops to learn about the beauty of chopping, dicing and cutting fresh foods for kids.

The culinary workshops were hosted by Live54218, which is coordinating farm-to-school efforts. The program emphasizes using fresh foods in school cafeterias - but food services workers must know how to prepare them.

The De Pere culinary workshops included lessons on the proper way to hold a knife, and how to keep a cutting board in place.

Jean Beno works for the Ashwaubenon School District. She says it’s good for kids to know where their food originates.

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Information from: Press-Gazette Media, https://www.greenbaypressgazette.comhttps://www.greenbaypressgazette.com

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Post-rehab, injured snowy owl released into wild

SUPERIOR, Wis. (AP) - A rare snowy owl that was apparently hit by a bus in the nation’s capital flew back into the wild on Saturday, after weeks of rehab in Minnesota and procedures to replace its flight feathers.

Officials with the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota released the owl at about noon Saturday outside Superior, Wis., near the Minnesota and Wisconsin state border. That location was chosen by a biologist because snowy owls have been spotted there in recent winters, indicating there is good habitat for hunting.

“The snowy flew off with strong steady wing beats, showing off the new flight feathers,” Julia Ponder, The Raptor’s Center director, said in a statement. “He is in great condition and will hopefully head back north in the coming days.”

The owl was found injured in downtown Washington in late January and taken to the National Zoo before being transferred to a Washington, D.C., wildlife rehabilitation center. It was then sent to The Raptor Center, which has expertise in replacing damaged feathers. It has since completed about a three-week exercise program and regained physical fitness before it was deemed ready for release.

Snowy owls are native to the Arctic but were seen all along the East Coast this winter, as far south as Florida.

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Winnebago authorities rescue 22 animals from home

OSHKOSH, Wis. (AP) - A Winnebago County woman has been arrested after authorities found nearly two dozen animals living in deplorable conditions in the Town of Clayton.

Since Thursday, authorities have rescued 17 horses and five dogs from the home, WGBA-TV reported (https://bit.ly/1jkB128https://bit.ly/1jkB128 ). Winnebago sheriff’s detective Chris Braman said they did not look healthy. Another three horses were found dead.

Cattle Rescue Inc. will be caring for the surviving horses.

“Being that they’re malnourished and they’re not as strong as they should be, it makes it that much worse,” rescue organization director Bill Blemke said.

The dogs went to the Oshkosh Humane Society and were being checked out by a veterinarian.

The 51-year-old woman was in custody and could face several animal mistreatment charges. Investigators plan to present a case to prosecutors in coming days.

The Winnebago County Health Department has declared the house unlivable.

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Police investigate threatening letter in Stoughton

STOUGHTON, Wis. (AP) - Police in Stoughton are investigating a threatening letter that was sent to a black teenager, with a photo that depicted him as the victim of a lynching.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports (https://bit.ly/1mlA1Aahttps://bit.ly/1mlA1Aa ) the letter had a Madison postmark but no return address. The family told the newspaper it contained a photo showing two men hanging from a tree, with a mob watching. A picture of the 18-year-old was superimposed onto one of the men.

Police say in a statement that they took the letter and its contents to the state crime lab for processing, and the FBI and U.S. Postal Service have been contacted. Police say “this type of behavior will not be tolerated” and those responsible will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

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Information from: Wisconsin State Journal, https://www.madison.com/wsjhttps://www.madison.com/wsj


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