- The Washington Times - Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The political action arm for MoveOn.org officially kicked off a campaign Wednesday to try to convince Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts to run for president in 2016 after more than 80 percent of members voted to move forward with the campaign.

“MoveOn members have spoken clearly, and we are today throwing our full weight behind this Run Warren Run campaign to show Senator Warren she has the support of millions of Americans across the country,” said Ilya Sheyman, executive director of MoveOn.org Political Action.

The group has pledged to invest at least $1 million in the first phase of the launch; the campaign will include organizing in early primary and caucus states like Iowa and New Hampshire, recruiting small-dollar donors, and assembling a “national volunteer army” to work for her if she runs.

A nearly four-minute launch video intersperses commentary about problems facing the American middle class with remarks Ms. Warren has delivered in past speeches and brief biographical information about the senator, who has quickly emerged as a hero of liberal and progressive groups since she was first elected in 2012.

Ms. Warren has said repeatedly she’s not running, but the calls for her to run indicate that even the prospect of her candidacy could have an effect on the race for the Democratic nomination, which public polls show is former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s to lose at this point if she chooses to run.

The liberal group Democracy for America also reiterated its support for a would-be Warren candidacy Wednesday, despite an op-ed in Politico by former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean saying he would support Mrs. Clinton if she runs.

DFA was originally founded by Mr. Dean and is chaired by his brother, Jim.

Mrs. Warren recently placed first in a “pulse poll” of DFA members on their preferred presidential candidates for 2016 with 42 percent of the vote, with Sen. Bernie Sanders, Vermont independent, second at 24 percent and Mrs. Clinton third at 23 percent.


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