- Associated Press - Wednesday, April 13, 2016

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - The Latest on the start of Oklahoma’s three-day filing period for elected office (all times local):

5:20 p.m.

More than 250 candidates for various Oklahoma state and federal offices have filed candidacy papers indicating their plans to run for office in November.

Oklahoma Election Board officials say 254 political hopefuls filed for office by the end of candidate filing at 5 p.m. Wednesday. Filing will continue Thursday and Friday at the state Capitol.

Election Board spokesman Bryan Dean says that’s the most candidates who have filed for office on the first day since 2004.

All of the 101 seats in the Oklahoma House and 25 seats in the 48-member Senate are up for grabs in the fall, along with one of Oklahoma’s U.S. Senate seats, all five U.S. House seats and a six-year term on the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.

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11 a.m.

Each of Oklahoma’s five Republican U.S. House incumbents have filed candidacy papers indicating their plans to seek re-election in November.

U.S. Reps. Jim Bridenstine, Tom Cole, Frank Lucas, Markwayne Mullin and Steve Russell each filed declarations of candidacy on Wednesday, the first day of Oklahoma’s three-day filing period for political office.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford of Edmond is seeking a full six-year term in that seat, but says he plans to file his paperwork on Friday.

Russell is seeking his second term in Oklahoma’s 5th District and already has drawn an opponent in Democrat Tom Guild of Edmond.

Other offices on the ballot in November include all 101 state House seats, 25 Oklahoma Senate seats and a six-year term on the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.

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8:05 a.m.

Pittsburg County Sheriff Joel Kerns has the distinction of being the first candidate to file for state office in Oklahoma in 2016.

The 55-year-old McAlester Democrat filed paperwork Wednesday to run for a four-year term in the state Senate.

Kerns says he showed up at the state Capitol about 5:30 a.m. Wednesday and was surprised to see he was the first candidate in line on the first of a three-day filing period for state office.

Offices on the ballot in November include all 101 state House, 25 Oklahoma Senate seats, one U.S. Senate seat, five U.S. House posts, and a six-year term on the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.

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8 a.m.

Nearly three dozen Oklahoma educators who say they’re frustrated by some Republican-backed changes to public education are among those filing for seats in the state House and Senate during the first of a three-day filing period in Oklahoma City.

Candidates for all 101 seats in the Oklahoma House and 25 posts in the 48-member state Senate began filing Wednesday at the state Capitol.

Among the other offices on the ballot in November are one U.S. Senate seat, five U.S. House posts, and a six-year term on the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.

Many parents and teachers in Oklahoma say they’re growing weary of legislative tinkering with public education. Republican-led attempts this year to approve a voucher system for private schools and consolidate some school districts fueled discontentment among educators.


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