- Associated Press - Friday, April 8, 2016

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (AP) - The Latest on new rules for school barricade devices (all times local):

12:55 p.m.

A disability rights group is questioning new rules allowing schools to deploy barricade devices in the event of an active shooter, saying the rules aren’t consistent with federal law.

The Ohio Disability Rights Law and Policy Center says the Americans with Disabilities Act doesn’t create an exception for such devices to the general requirement that locks be usable by people with disabilities.

Michael Kirkman, the center’s executive director, says the only exception governs doors operated by security personnel.



The Ohio building standards board on Friday gave final approval to the rules overseeing the barricade devices.

The Department of Commerce, which oversees the standards board, says it’s up to schools to explore options to comply with the federal disabilities law.

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11:05 a.m.

An Ohio building standards board has approved final rules allowing schools to deploy portable barricade devices in the event of an active shooter.

The devices gained popularity after the Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook Elementary School massacres and a 2012 shooting in the Cleveland suburb of Chardon that killed three students.

Some devices slide under doors; others attach to door handles. The Board of Building Standards approved the rules Friday.

Arkansas, Kansas, Michigan, New Jersey and Ohio are among states that have updated their fire or building codes to allow the devices.

Skeptics say the devices are complicated to install under stress and could lead to dangerous unintended consequences, including blocking authorities from an attacker inside a classroom.

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12:50 a.m.

An Ohio building standards board is ready to approval final rules allowing schools to deploy portable barricade devices in the event of an active shooter.

The devices gained popularity after the Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook Elementary School massacres and a 2012 shooting in the Cleveland suburb of Chardon that killed three students.

Some devices slide under doors; others attach to door handles. The Board of Building Standards planned a Friday hearing.

Arkansas, Kansas, Michigan, New Jersey and Ohio are among states that have updated their fire or building codes to allow the devices.

Skeptics say the devices are complicated to install under stress and could lead to dangerous unintended consequences, including blocking authorities from an attacker inside a classroom.

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