- Associated Press - Wednesday, June 15, 2016

LAS VEGAS (AP) - The Latest on Nevada primary election day voting on state legislative races (all times local):

10:25 p.m.

A rural Nevada assemblyman under fire for supporting last year’s tax increase has survived a Republican primary that included a challenge from a supporter of southern Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy.

James Oscarson of Pahrump was among the few rural Republicans who voted in favor of Gov. Brian Sandoval’s packages of tax hikes and education initiatives.

Oscarson defeated Rusty Stanberry and Bundy-backer Tina Trenner in Tuesday night’s primary election in Assembly District 36. It covers parts of Clark, Lincoln and Nye counties.

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10:10 p.m.

The speaker of last year’s Nevada State Assembly has become the latest Republican incumbent to survive a primary challenge attacking his vote for Gov. Brian Sandoval’s tax package and education initiatives.

Clark County Republican John Hambrick defeated Clayton Hurst Tuesday night in the GOP primary in Assembly District 2.

Two other Clark County Republicans who backed Sandoval also won their primaries - longtime Assemblywoman Melissa Woodbury and Paul Anderson, who served as majority leader in 2015.

In a key state Senate race between former Assembly members in the Summerlin area, tax supporter Erv Nelson lost to Victoria Seaman - a loud critic of the spending plan.

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9:30 p.m.

Incumbent Republican Assemblyman Paul Anderson of Clark County is headed back to the Nevada Legislature to serve a third term.

Anderson, who served as the Assembly majority leader last year, emerged as the winner Tuesday night in the GOP primary against Leonard Foster and Steve Sanson in District 13.

It effectively means Anderson has been re-elected because there are no Democrats or other splinter candidates running for the seat in November’s general election.

He was among the incumbent Republicans some right-wing, anti-tax groups had targeted for defeat because he supported Gov. Brian Sandoval’s tax package and education initiatives.

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9:05 p.m.

Victoria Seaman has won the Republican nomination for a key state Senate seat in Clark County in a battle between two former Nevada Assembly members.

Seaman defeated Erv Nelson Tuesday night in the GOP primary in Senate District 6, which includes the Summerlin area.

Seaman was a vocal critic of Gov. Brian Sandoval’s tax package and education initiatives, while Nelson supported them.

Theirs’ was one of the uglier contests among several legislative primary races pitting Sandoval-backers against anti-tax crusaders.

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9 p.m.

Longtime Republican Assemblywoman Melissa Woodbury has held off a GOP challenger in a key legislative primary in Clark County.

Woodbury defeated Swadeep Nigam on Tuesday night to move to November’s general election in the 23rd Assembly District.

Woodbury voted in favor last year of Gov. Brian Sandoval’s tax package and education initiatives. She won an endorsement from the popular Republican governor.

Nigam is a local Republican activist who works as an analyst with the Las Vegas Valley Water District. Sandoval earlier appointed him to the Nevada Equal Rights Commission.

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3:25 p.m.

Republican lawmakers who took the risky move of supporting GOP Gov. Brian Sandoval’s $1.4 billion tax plan face their biggest test yet on Tuesday.

The heated primary election is the first hurdle for Republicans hoping to maintain the 36-27 legislative majority they won in the conservative “red wave” of 2014.

It will also gauge whether Republican voters resonate with Sandoval’s vision of investing more in the bottom-ranking school system, or whether they feel betrayed that taxes were raised to do it.

Democratic lawmakers unanimously supported the tax plan and aren’t showing the same angst about it. But some still face tough costly primaries as the party pursues its ultimate quest: taking a majority in the Legislature to match the majority they have among Nevada registered voters.


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