- Associated Press - Saturday, May 14, 2016

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) - In a story May 14 about Riordan Mansion, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the building is a historic hotel. It is a combination of two homes on property owned by Arizona State Parks.

A corrected version of the story is below:

State, historic society partner to keep Riordan Mansion open

Flagstaff’s historic Riordan Mansion will remain open thanks to a partnership between Arizona State Parks and the Arizona Historical Society

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) - Flagstaff’s historic Riordan Mansion will remain open thanks to a partnership between Arizona State Parks and the Arizona Historical Society.

Both agencies renewed an agreement this week to operate the Riordan Mansion State Historic Park for the next three years by leaning on volunteers, The Arizona Daily Sun reported (https://bit.ly/1XrgbEW). The agencies have been teaming up to keep the historic 40-room home open for the past six years.

The partnership is about preserving the landmark, said Anne Woosley, director of the Arizona Historical Society. “We realize we couldn’t do it all and if we pool our resources we could cover much more,” Woosley said.

The current partnership started in 2010 when Arizona State Parks saw more than $4.8 million in budget cuts and was considering closing the mansion.

Per the new agreement, state parks will continue to own the property, located on the west side of Northern Arizona University’s campus, and the Arizona Historical Society will continue to operate the mansion with help from volunteers. Officials say the $250,000 in operating costs is covered by visitor admission, donations, gift shop sales, special events and fundraising.

The mansion sees about 25,000 visitors a year.

The mansion, which was built in 1904, was actually two almost identical homes built by brothers Michael and Timothy Riordan. Both homes are connected by a rendezvous room and occupy 13,000 square feet in all. The brothers were part of a prominent family credited with shaping the development of Flagstaff and northern Arizona.

Family members gave the property and five acres of land surrounding it to Arizona State Parks in November 1978. Part of the park opened to the public in August 1983 with admission costing 50 cents.


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