- The Washington Times - Sunday, November 27, 2016

Playing the Black pieces, Norwegian world chess champion Magnus Carlsen easily held the draw in the penultimate game of his 12-game title match with Russian challenger Sergey Karjakin Saturday, leaving the two players tied at 5 1/2-5 1/2 with just one more round to go.

After a rest day Sunday, Carlsen, who won Thursday’s Game 10 to level the match, will again have the advantage of the White pieces and the first move Monday. If the two grandmasters are still tied, a one-day rapid playoff will be held Wednesday. The match, with a total purse of $1.1 million, is being played at Manhattan’s South Street Seaport complex.

In another Closed Ruy Lopez (6. d3), Karjakin as White could make little headway against Black’s solid defensive set-up. Carlsen even appeared to hold a slight initiative with a series of forceful central pawn pushes. The exchanges triggered by 20. Bg5 Bxg5 21. Qxg5 dxe4 22. fxe6 Rxf1+ 23. Rxf1 Qxe6 produced a completely equal game in which both players had a queen and rook and no clear way to obtain an advantage. Carlsen tried to inject some life into the position by infiltrating his queen via a2, but after 32. Qxe6 Qxe1+ 33. Kh2 Qf2, White has a perpetual check with 34. Qe4+ and the Black king has nowhere to hide. The players instantly agreed to the draw.

The moves of Saturday’s Game 11 were:

Karjakin-Carlsen, FIDE World Championship Match, Game 11, New York, November 2016

1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. a3 O-O 9. Nc3 Be6 10. Nd5 Nd4 11. Nxd4 exd4 12. Nxf6+ Bxf6 13. Bxe6 fxe6 14. f4 c5 15. Qg4 Qd7 16. f5 Rae8 17. Bd2 c4 18. h3 c3 19. bxc3 d5 20. Bg5 Bxg5 21. Qxg5 dxe4 22. fxe6 Rxf1+ 23. Rxf1 Qxe6 24. cxd4 e3 25. Re1 h6 26. Qh5 e2 27. Qf3 a5 28. c3 Qa2 29. Qc6 Re6 30. Qc8+ Kh7 31. c4 Qd2 32. Qxe6 Qxe1+ 33. Kh2 Qf2 34. Qe4+ Draw agreed

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