- Associated Press - Tuesday, October 11, 2016

NEW ORLEANS (AP) - The Latest on wrongful conviction compensation for man exonerated of murder (all times local):

5:30 p.m.

The woman in charge of the estate of a man who was exonerated of murder says the Louisiana Supreme Court’s refusal to hear his case isn’t the end of the story. Andrea Armstrong says two federal lawsuits seek compensation for Glenn Ford’s wrongful conviction and his treatment in prison.

Armstrong says that although the state released Ford, it refuses to be held accountable for or acknowledge “the gross injustice done to Glenn and his surviving family.”

Ford died of lung cancer in June 2015, nearly a year after being cleared of the murder of a Shreveport jeweler.

Two lower courts ruled that Ford cannot get money from the victims’ compensation fund because he committed related crimes. State law excludes compensation for someone who committed “any crime based upon the same set of facts used in his original conviction.”

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noon

The lawyer for a man who was exonerated of murder after almost 30 years on death row says she and his family are “deeply disappointed” Louisiana’s Supreme Court has rejected his claim for compensation for wrongful conviction.

Attorney Kristin Wenstrom says that although the state agreed that Glenn Ford’s conviction should be overturned, it has failed to pay for or even acknowledge “all of the years he lost while suffering on death row for a crime he did not commit.”

Ford died of lung cancer in June 2015, nearly a year after being cleared of the murder of a Shreveport jeweler.

The high court’s refusal Monday to hear the case leaves intact state district and appeal court rulings.

Wenstrom says Ford’s will set up a trust for his grandchildren in case he had been awarded compensation.

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The Louisiana Attorney General’s Office says it’s pleased with Monday’s state Supreme Court decision not to consider compensating the family of a man exonerated of murder after almost 30 years on death row.

The court left intact lower court rulings against Glenn Ford, who died of lung cancer after he was cleared of killing a Shreveport jeweler during a holdup.

Those courts noted that the law excludes compensation for someone who committed “any crime based upon the same set of facts used in his original conviction.” Ford was convicted of a single offense - capital murder - but the trial judge said evidence showed he committed at least two related crimes.

Attorney general’s spokeswoman Ruth Wisher says prosecutors believed all along that Ford was involved in criminal activity the day of Rozeman’s murder.

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9:20 a.m.

Louisiana’s Supreme Court won’t consider whether the family of a man who was exonerated after almost 30 years on death row is due compensation for wrongful conviction.

That leaves intact rulings against Glenn Ford, who died of lung cancer nearly a year after he was cleared of killing a jeweler during a holdup.

A state district judge had ruled in March 2015 that he couldn’t get compensation because trial evidence showed that he was involved in lesser related crimes.

Judge Katherine Dorroh said Ford knew about plans to rob Isadore Rozeman and did nothing to stop the holdup, and tried to destroy evidence by selling stolen items and trying to sell the murder weapon.

The high court refused without comment Monday to hear the case. Chief Justice Bernette Johnson voted to hear it.


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