- The Washington Times - Thursday, August 24, 2017

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Colin Kaepernick, at this point, may very well be known more for his anti-American political activism than his football play.

So it’s no wonder the queen of anti-Americanism, Linda Sarsour, jumped into the fray herself and joined with the NAACP to protest outside NFL headquarters in New York City, and demand that the former 49er be picked up by a team.

Talk about going low.

Sarsour, of course, is best known for running down constitutional America, issuing scathing criticisms against President Donald Trump and demanding that Islam become the religion that guides our country’s politics and culture — well, just about, anyway. And Kaepernick?

He’s the guy who won’t stand for the singing and playing of our National Anthem.

It’s a match made in heaven.

But it’s not likely to get Kaepernick a team. Coaches and owners already see him as a political hot potato — somewhere between a distraction and an outright enemy of the nation. This demonstration in New York City isn’t likely to change that notion.

The NAACP called the affair the “United We Stand” march, a rather curious title since it’s the complete opposite of what Kaepernick does during season games.

Oh, the irony. Maybe a better tag would’ve been “United We Kneel.”

Anyhow, Kaepernick declared free agency at the end of last season. And there he still sits, teamless, on the sidelines, rather pitifully waiting to be picked.

It’s not going to happen.

Kaepernick chose his team — and bluntly, it’s Black Lives Matter.

That the NAACP, Sarsour and others of similar ideology are now branding his inability to obtain a new team a sure sign of racism is laughable.

The NAACP may say Kaepernick is being punished for “exercising his free speech,” and that Commissioner Roger Goodell needs to step in and right this egregious wrong. But fact is: NFL fans are only exercising their free speech by slamming Kaepernick as anti-American. And NFL powers-who-be are only reacting to the fans who provide their livelihoods.

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