- The Washington Times - Wednesday, January 11, 2017

The Texas teenager who earned the nickname “Clock Boy” in September 2015 after he was temporarily detained by police had a lawsuit against The Blaze’s Glenn Beck dismissed on Monday.

Ahmed Mohamed gained national attention and a meeting with President Obama in 2015 after a “suitcase clock” he brought to MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas, landed him in trouble with police.

The media circus that followed the Sept. 14, 2015, incident prompted the 14-year-old’s family to file a defamation lawsuit against Irving Mayor Beth Van Duyne, Glenn Beck, and the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Security Policy. District Judge Maricela Moore tossed the case against the conservative pundit and the think tank, while Ms. Van Duyne is still listed as a defendant.

A similar lawsuit filed in December against a local Fox affiliate and pundit Ben Ferguson was dismissed by another judge.

“Mr. Beck and The Blaze are pleased at the court’s faithful application of First Amendment principles pursuant to the Texas Citizen Participation Act, the very purpose of which is to protect freedom of speech by mandating the summary dismissal of unmeritorious defamation claims,” Mr. Beck’s attorney, Michael J. Grygiel, wrote in an email Tuesday to the Dallas Morning News.

The Mohameds were seeking $100,000 in damages along with “nonmonetary relief.”

The mayor’s legal representation, Deputy City Attorney Janet Spugnardi, said the lawsuit should also be dropped against her client because public comments were made within Ms. Van Duyne’s capacity as a city official. The Mohameds claim Ms. Van Duyne lied when she told reporters the family was “nonresponsive” to the city’s request to provide information on her child’s ordeal.

Susan Hutchison, an attorney for the Mohamed family, did not return the newspaper’s request for comment.

A hearing on the mayor’s motion to dismiss has not yet been scheduled, Ms. Spugnardi said.


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