- The Washington Times - Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Georgetown professor and author Michael Eric Dyson used a CNN segment Wednesday on President Obama’s legacy to segue into racial commentary likening police to the Islamic State group.

It took only minutes for a “New Day” discussion between Mr. Dyson and show hosts Chris Cuomo and Alisyn Camerota to veer from Mr. Obama’s time in office to the alleged racism of President-elect Donald Trump’s voters and American police officers.

The hosts pushed back on the idea that racism was responsible for Mr. Trump’s Election Day win before the activist compared police officers to the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

Mr. Cuomo said many voters “feel we’ve been weak on ISIS,” and that such an issue is “color-neutral,” which prompted Mr. Dyson to interject.

“Color-neutral and ISIS? Many African-American people say we were introduced to terror long before 9/11: the vicious police forces of America that victimized us, and the way white supremacy operated,” the author said, Mediaite reported.

“How many people have died from terror in America in the last 10 years? Maybe a hundred,” Mr. Dyson said after the host called his comment a “false equivalency. Most people have died not from Muhammad, but Billy Bob. In terms of white people, white-on-white crime has done far more to damage America than ISIS.”

The professor’s comments come one month after the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund reported that 21 of 135 officers killed in 2016 while on duty died from ambush-style killings.

Mr. Dyson’s terrorism-death timeline also did not include the 2,977 victims in killed in New York, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., during the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks orchestrated by al Qaeda.


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