- Associated Press - Thursday, January 26, 2017

ROUND ROCK, Texas (AP) - In a story transmitted Jan. 26 about the 90th anniversary of a deadly bus-train wreck, The Associated Press reported erroneously, based on information from the Waco Tribune-Herald, that the accident happened Jan. 27, 1927. It happened Jan. 22, 1927.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Jan. 22 marked 90 years since wreck killed 10 Baylor players

More than 100 people recently packed into the Round Rock City Council chamber and then flocked to the Mays Street overpass over the Union Pacific railroad tracks to help rededicate the bridge as the Immortal Bridge

This is an AP Member Exchange shared by the Waco Tribune-Herald



By DON BOLDING

Waco Tribune-Herald

ROUND ROCK, Texas (AP) - More than 100 people recently packed into the Round Rock City Council chamber and then flocked to the Mays Street overpass over the Union Pacific railroad tracks to help rededicate the bridge as the Immortal Bridge.

The bridge now honors the memory of the 10 Baylor University basketball players who lost their lives in a train-bus collision when the site was just an intersection between street and tracks.

A weather-worn memorial plaque was erected years ago, but light posts on the bridge now include 10 Baylor-green poles that carry engravings made from photographs of the 10 students who lost their lives Jan. 22, 1927, when the Sunshine Special train hit their bus in a driving rainstorm. The accident was the moving force behind construction of the overpass at the site and implementation of other crossing safety measures around the country.

On the bridge after the City Hall ceremony, many found the engravings of their relatives - few, if any, direct ancestors because the dead were only college students. The relatives included several family members of Merle M. Dudley, who had been a law student.

“I’m his niece, and his great-niece and great-great-niece are here,” said Sue Dudley Holloway, of Round Rock. “We were just remarking that the picture really shows a family resemblance.”

She said her father, Ted Holloway, Merle’s brother, always remembered being among the ones called to identify and claim the body. The story has been the stuff of family legend through the years, but “I’ve lived in a lot of places as part of a military family,” she said, “and I didn’t realize until recently how much a part of Baylor’s culture the accident still is.”

Included in Baylor’s homecoming traditions each year is a retelling of the story of the accident to freshmen with a candlelight ceremony to inspire a spirit of unity, according to Wacohistory.org.

Round Rock Mayor Alan McGraw thanked Union Pacific for donating $100,000 for the bridge project.

“The lives of the young men who died were short but not meaningless,” he said. “They’re still having an impact on our lives today.”

He and other speakers recounted that the crash victims included many other wounded. At least one of those killed, Clyde Kelley, pushed teammate Weir Washam out of an open window to safety when he saw the train coming, at the cost of his own life.

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