- The Washington Times - Monday, October 23, 2017

The threat of U.S. “neo-Nazis” has Katie Couric battling for sleep these days as she works on podcasts and a six-part National Geographic series.

The former star of NBC’s Today show is keeping busy with her production company and a Lifetime movie on Flint, Michigan, but in an interview with The Cut published Monday she lamented sleep-deprived and “anxiety-ridden times” produced by racists and tyrannical regimes.

“After I left the ‘Today’ show, it took me about two days to get back on a normal sleep schedule,” she said. “But I used to be a championship sleeper, and now I don’t sleep as well as I used to. Maybe it’s just that my mind is going a hundred miles an hour 100 percent of the time, or it’s just that we’re living in anxiety-ridden times. Between neo-Nazis and North Korea, I’m having trouble sleeping.”

Ms. Couric, whose resume also includes a stint as the anchor of the “CBS Evening News,” said she keeps abreast of the news by waking up at 6:30 a.m.

“I’m also a newsletter junkie, so I read a lot in the morning: Politico Playbook, Axios, the Hive, the Times, theSkimm, MediaREDEF, Quartz Daily Brief, the Washington Post Morning Mix, the Washington Post Politics, and the Huffington Post,” she said.

The journalist’s comments come roughly three months after an small coalition of white supremacists and neo-Nazi groups protested in Charlottesville, Virigina.

Heather Heyer, 32, died Aug. 12 after groups fought over the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. She was run over by a vehicle operated by James Alex Fields, 20, who was arrested and charged with second-degree murder shortly afterward.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, a liberal nonprofit organization that monitors civil rights abuses, estimates that Ku Klux Klan membership in the U.S. tallies between 5,000-8,000 “often warring” members.

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