- The Washington Times - Tuesday, October 24, 2017

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has banned the use of e-cigarettes and electronic nicotine device systems in areas that are already non-smoking, in a preemptive move against unknown negative health effects from the vaporized smoke the devices emit.

“These products are marketed as a healthier alternative to cigarettes but the reality is they also carry long-term risks to the health of users and those around them,” Mr. Cuomo said Monday. “This measure closes another dangerous loophole in the law, creating a stronger, healthier New York for all.”

Electronic cigarette were added as a banned item under the Clean Indoor Air Act, which bans the use of smoking tobacco in a number of places including restaurants, bars, schools and public parks.

In July, Mr. Cuomo signed a law banning the use of e-cigarettes on public and private school grounds in the state, the statement read.

In 2014, about 12.4 percent of U.S. adults had tried an e-cigarette, and about 3.7 percent regularly use e-cigarettes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among youth, about 2 million reported smoking e-cigarettes or some version.

While health officials say the vapor produced by e-cigarettes is safer than combustible cigarettes, much is unknown about the potentially dangerous health effects of using the products. In teenagers, among whom vaping has grown threefold in popularity, the nicotine and chemicals in the “vape juice” is dangerous to the developing brain and lungs. Other dangerous chemicals in the vaping liquid include formaldehyde and antifreeze.

In July, the FDA announced it will review nicotine levels in both cigarettes and e-cigarettes to create a standard level that is non-addictive.

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