- The Washington Times - Thursday, September 28, 2017

Chris Wray was formally installed as the head of the FBI during a ceremony Thursday at the bureau’s headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke highly of Mr. Wray at the event, calling him a model of integrity and noting that he has “no hidden agendas.” He also had a few words of advice for the new director.

“In the days to come, Chris, there will be many controversies. There seem to be a lot of them these days,” Mr. Sessions said. “It is the nature of the job.”

Two people who would likely serve as a reminder of current controversies, former FBI directors James Comey and Robert Mueller, were not in attendance at Thursday’s event.

Mr. Comey was fired from the job earlier this year by President Trump. Mr. Mueller is leading the special counsel investigation into Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election and any possible collision with members of the Trump campaign. The scope of his investigation also includes the circumstances that led to Mr. Comey’s dismissal.

Former FBI directors typically attend such ceremonies. But Andrew McCabe, who served as acting director after Mr. Comey was fired, and former director William Webster, who was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to lead the bureau, were the only former heads of the FBI who attended.

Hundreds of FBI employees gathered in the courtyard in the center of headquarters to watch the event.

Mr. Wray, who previously led the Justice Department’s criminal division, told employees that he was excited to be back at the bureau.

“My wife and kids may already have gotten tired of me saying this, but I have to say I get up every morning fired up to come to work, fired up to be part of this extraordinary group, and fired up to see what we can do next,” Mr. Wray said.
He remarked on the challenges the bureau faces, including evolving terrorist threats and the challenge of keeping up with the evolution of technology used by criminals.

“We know we are going to have to up our game,” he said.

But Mr. Wray said the changes the FBI will undergo in years to come should not change its core mission.

“Some things cannot and will not change. Our mission is simple but profound - to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution.” Mr. Wray said. “That mission hasn’t changed and it won’t change — not as long as I have anything to say about it. We’re going to abide by the rule of law and our core values. We’re going to follow the facts independently, no matter where they lead and no matter who likes it. And we will always, always seek justice.”

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