- The Washington Times - Wednesday, June 13, 2018

The U.S. Army recently put word out that it wanted submachine guns for conventional forces, and gun-makers were quick to respond.

Ten companies are currently vying to supply troops outside the special operations forces realm with subguns for the modern battlefield. Officials said they wanted a weapon with full/semi-automatic selectable variant and a Picatinny rail, among other features, and organizations from Sig Sauer, Inc. to Colt answered the call.

“For the first time in a long time, the Army is looking at a subgun for conventional forces,” Todd South of Military Times reported Wednesday. “Special operations forces have carried these guns for a very long time, but your conventional soldiers and Marines don’t really have them in their arsenal until now.”

The Army received the following submissions:

  • Z-5RS, Z-5P and Z-5K Sub Compact Weapons; Zenith Firearms
  • B&T MP9 Machine Guns; Trident Rifles, LLC
  • MPX Sub Compact Weapon; Sig Sauer, Inc.
  • 5.5 CLT and 5.5 QV5 Sub Compact Weapon; Quarter Circle 10 LLC
  • PTR 9CS Sub Compact Weapon; PTR Industries, Inc.
  • MARS-L9 Compact Suppressed Weapon; Lewis Machine & Tool Company
  • CZ Scorpion EVO 3 A1 Submachine gun; CZ-USA
  • CMMG Ultra PDW; CMMG, Inc.
  • Beretta PMX Sub Compact Weapon; USA Corporation
  • CM9MM-9H-M5A; Colt’s Manufacturing Company, LLC

“Another subgun option the Army could consider is [Heckler & Koch’s] MP5,” Mr. South reported. “The [MP5 MLI] is an improved version on what they’ve had for decades. It’s pretty familiar to a lot of people. A lot of folks growing up like I did in the 1980s and 1990s might have seen it. The Navy SEALs carried it.” 

Mr. South, an Iraq War veteran, stressed after the search began in May that officials do not want to equip every soldier with such weapons — only “those who might need a personal protection type weapon for certain missions.”


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