- The Washington Times - Friday, May 4, 2018

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signed a bill Friday that ​​outlaw​s abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

The “heartbeat” bill makes Iowa one of the most restrictive states in the nation when it comes to abortion.

“I believe that all innocent life is precious and sacred, and as governor, I pledged to do everything in my power to protect it,” Ms. Reynolds, a Republican, said in a statement. “That is what I am doing today. I understand that not everyone will agree with this decision. But if death is determined when a heart stops beating, then doesn’t a beating heart indicate life?”

The bill’s supporters and detractors both acknowledge the legislation will likely provoke a legal challenge.

Ms. Reynolds said courts “may even put a hold on the law until it reaches the Supreme Court.”

“However, this is bigger than just a law,” she continued. “This is about life. I am not going to back down from who I am or what I believe in.”

Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the pro-life Susan B. Anthony List, said the heartbeat bill could eventually present a challenge to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision creating a constitutional right to abortion.

“The bold pro-life action taken by the Iowa legislature reflects growing national pro-life sentiment and restlessness under the extreme status quo imposed by Roe v. Wade,” Ms. Dannenfelser said in a statement. “While Roe has not yet been reversed, it has been soundly rejected in the court of public opinion.”

Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, said the heartbeat bill will “undoubtedly be challenged by the courts like other unconstitutional abortion bans before it.”

“This should be deeply concerning to anyone who believes women should be allowed to make decisions about their bodies and control their destinies,” Ms. Hogue said in a statement, “and we now look to the courts to defend our essential human rights.”


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide