- The Washington Times - Monday, October 1, 2018

The Trump administration’s new three-way trade deal to replace NAFTA got a thumbs-up from American farmers.

Americans for Farmers & Families spokesman Casey Guernsey, a seventh-generation farmer, said the three-way deal showed Mr. Trump remembered his promise “to stand up for rural America.”

“After years of declining income and months of trade uncertainty, farmers desperately needed a win, and today the Trump administration delivered it,” he said. “While eager to learn the details, I hope that Congress will use this positive momentum to bring this important agreement over the finish line.”

Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Iowa Republican, said the agreement looked “very favorable” to American and Iowa agriculture.

Pres Trump’s tough negotiation position may [be] paying off,” Mr. Grassley tweeted.

He said he would let voters know if his positive view of the deal changes after a more thorough review of the details.

Mr. Trump called the 24-year-old NAFTA “the worst deal ever made” and made replacing it a top priority.

The administration struck a deal with Mexico in August. Canada held out until the last minute before a Monday deadline to get on board.

Both Canada and Mexico made concession to reach the 11th-hour agreement that was dubbed the U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement, or USMCA.

Mr. Guernsey, who headed up AFF’s effort to protect farmers from trade retaliation to the Trump administration’s steel and aluminum tariffs, said the president listened to the farmers’ concerns.

U.S. agriculture was one of the bigger winners in NAFTA, which is blamed for the mass exodus of American manufacturing and manufacturing jobs to Mexico during the past two decades.

“The significance of reaching an agreement with both Mexico and Canada cannot be overstated,” he said. “Since its implementation in 1994, our trade deal with the two countries, the North American Free Trade Agreement, has brought unprecedented economic success to the United States — not only through strong job growth, higher wages and low consumer prices, but also by allowing America’s food and agricultural industry to thrive.”


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