- The Washington Times - Wednesday, September 12, 2018

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Former independent counsel Ken Starr, who’s coming out with a book about his famous investigation into former President Bill Clinton and the blue dress, said he almost slapped Hillary Clinton with a perjury charge.

Almost. Almost?

And the rest of the world goes: Well, why didn’t you?

Hillary is so well known for her obstructions of truth that if you type a Google search on “hillary clinton list of lies,” nearly 45 million results pop. Heck, PolitiFact keeps a running count, titled “All False statements involving Hilary Clinton.”

Among her whoppers?

“There have been more than 270 mass shootings in the United States in the last year alone. That’s where four or more are killed,” she claimed on Oct. 10, 2017 — a statement that PolitiFact rated as “False, Clinton misstates key part of mass shooting definition.”

Another, during her campaign against Donald Trump in August of 2016: “[Trump] doesn’t make a thing in America.” As PolitiFact noted: “Trump hats, wine and water come from the U.S.”

And another, from July 2016, when she said she “never received nor sent any material that was marked classified” on her private and home-based email server, while serving in the State Department. But as PolitiFact wrote — False, False, False.

“Contradicted by the FBI” is how the fact-checking site put it.

That’s but a drop in HRC’s big ol’ bucketful of lies, deceptions, misstatements, skews, spins and waterings of truth.

Starr, in his new book “Contempt: A Memoir of the Clinton Investigation,” said at one point during his investigation, Hillary drifted so far into fantasy land, he very nearly pulled her back with the same perjury charge he gave her husband.

“I was upset over Mrs. Clinton’s performance and was even considering bringing the matter before the Washington grand jury for possible indictment on perjury,” Starr wrote, Mediaite reported. “[I]n the space of three hours, she claimed, by our count, over a hundred times that she ‘did not recall’ or ‘did not remember.’ This suggested outright mendacity. To be sure, human memory is notoriously fallible, but her strained performance struck us as preposterous.”

It was. Still is. But this is the woman who famously whined during congressional testimony on Benghazi, about truth — about the truth of the root of the terror attack that left four Americans dead: “What difference at this point does it make?”

Her view hasn’t changed much over the decades. 

• Cheryl Chumley can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter, @ckchumley.


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