- The Washington Times - Friday, December 27, 2019

President Trump on Friday shared a post on Twitter containing a hashtag associated with QAnon, a far-right conspiracy theory that has previously raised concerns within the FBI.

Mr. Trump shared a post originally tweeted four days earlier containing a more than two-minute-long video of an unidentified woman accusing the president’s critics of corruption.

The original tweet is captioned “Don’t you agree” and “Pray for this President,” followed by nine different hashtags — keywords or phrases preceded by a pound sign that allows Twitter users to categorize their content and make them easier to find.


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Among the nine hashtags included in the post retweeted by Mr. Trump is “#WWG1WA,” an abbreviation for “Where We Go One, We Go All,” a motto used by proponents of QAnon.

Originated on the 4chan website in late 2017, the QAnon conspiracy theory purports in parts that a so-called “deep state” existing within the U.S. government is working to undermine the Trump administration.



A bulletin issued by the FBI’s Phoenix field office in May raised concerns specifically about QAnon and Pizzagate, a different conspiracy theory that alleges Democrats operate a pedophile ring from a D.C. pizzeria, warning each “very likely will emerge, spread, and evolve in the modern information marketplace, occasionally driving both groups and individual extremists to carry out criminal or violent act,” Yahoo News reported in August.

Other hashtags included in the post retweeted by the president referenced morning television programs aired by Fox News and MSNBC, as well as several slogans associated with Mr. Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign.

The White House did not immediately reply to a message left requesting comment.

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