- The Washington Times - Sunday, October 13, 2019

Sen. Elizabeth Warren increased her advantage over former Vice President Joseph R. Biden across early states in the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, according to polling released on Sunday.

Ms. Warren had a 31% to 25% edge over Mr. Biden among voters across 18 early primary and caucus states, up from a 1-point, 26% to 25% edge over Mr. Biden in surveys released last month, according to the CBS News polling.

In New Hampshire, she led Mr. Biden by 8 points, 32% to 24%, up from a 1-point edge last month.

Ms. Warren and Mr. Biden were also tied at 22% apiece in Iowa, after Ms. Warren had trailed the former vice president by 12 points last month.

Mr. Biden did still hold a sizable advantage in South Carolina, leading with 43% of the vote. He was followed by Ms. Warren at 18% and Mr. Sanders at 16%.



But across the 18 states, Ms. Warren held an estimated delegate lead of 720 to 577 over Mr. Biden, with Mr. Sanders in third place at 159.

Last month, Mr. Biden had been clinging to an estimated delegate lead of 600 to 545 over Ms. Warren across the 18 states, with Mr. Sanders at 286.

While about three-quarters of Democrats said they’re at least somewhat satisfied about Mr. Biden’s response to President Trump’s attacks on him over Ukraine and his son’s business ties there, respondents rated Ms. Warren as better prepared to combat attacks from the president.

Nearly two-thirds said Ms. Warren would handle any attacks from the president “very well,” compared to 60% who said the same of Mr. Sanders and 50% who said the same of Mr. Biden.

Roughly two-thirds of respondents said they think Mr. Biden would probably win against Mr. Trump, but that was down from 77% a month ago. Ms. Warren’s numbers were generally steady on that front, with 56% of respondents saying they think she would probably defeat the president.

The overall survey of 7,858 registered voters across 18 states who identified as Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents was taken from Oct. 3-11 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 1.6%.

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