- The Washington Times - Friday, September 6, 2019

A behavioral scientist from Sweden named Magnus Soderlund argued in a recent presentation that the way to combat climate change, save the planet and secure the earth for scores of upcoming generations is to — get this — eat people.

As far as far-left ideas go, this one about cannibalism and climate change just takes the cake. Talk about the eww factor.

This guy’s whacked. That’s all there is to it.


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Soderland, a behavioral scientist and marketing strategist, brought forth the idea in a talk bluntly titled, “Can you Imagine Eating Human Flesh?”

Umm, no. Not without gagging, that is.



Among the talking points from his presentation, as reported by The Standard: “Are we humans too selfish to live sustainably? Is cannibalism the solution to food sustainability in the future? Does Generation Z have the answers to our food challenges? Can consumers be tricked into making the right decisions?”

That last question sounds some alarms because it brings with it this followup: Tricked?

God forbid government — any government — gets it in its governing mind to “trick” the people into eating chopped up human flesh. It’s bad enough the United Nations wants us to eat bugs. But people? Perish the thought. It’s enough to make a meat-eater turn vegetarian.

Soderland said it’s all a matter of overcoming the gross factor.

“I feel somewhat hesitant,” he said. “I’d have to say [though] … I’d be open to at least tasting it.”

Disease much?

Despicable.

Honestly, it just doesn’t get much more immoral than this. Think about it: If we have to do a Jeffrey Dahmer to defeat climate change — there might be something wrong with this picture.

• Cheryl Chumley can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter, @ckchumley.

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