- The Washington Times - Saturday, February 22, 2020

Sen. Bernard Sanders lead in the first preference of the Nevada Democratic presidential caucuses Saturday, according to entrance polls.

The polls also showed Mr. Sander’s strength with key demographics, including Hispanic voters and union households, that made him a favorite in the Silver State.

A win in Nevada cements the frontrunner status for the far-left Mr. Sanders, a Vermont senator and avowed socialist who is running on a platform of political revolution.

He was poised to emerge from Nevada as the clear leader in the delegate count and boasting support for a coalition of voters unmatched by any of his rivals.

The entrance polls, conducted for a consortium of news organizations, showed Mr. Sanders leading in the Nevada vote among men, women, white and Hispanic voters, voters ages 17 to 64, and among voters describing themselves as liberal, somewhat liberal and moderate or conservative.



The broad support enjoyed by Mr. Sanders in Nevada confirmed that his far-left campaign had staying power as it did in 2016 when he was beaten out for the nomination by Hillary Clinton.

Mr. Sanders placed second in the Iowa caucuses, losing by a whisker to former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

He won the New Hampshire primary, closely followed by Mr. Buttigieg.

The Nevada contest was the first test of the Democratic hopefuls support among large minority populations.

Among the Hispanic voters in Nevada, the entrance Mr. Sanders was the choice of 54% of that key constituency in the state.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Bien took 14% of the Hispanic vote, followed by Mr. Buttigieg at 9%, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts at 7% and Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota at 5%, according to the poll.

Mr. Biden led the field with black voters in the state, garnering 34% of their votes.

The former vice president, whose campaign has limped through the first few contests, has consistently led in support among black voters, which will be a boon when the race moves next to South Carolina.

The second-largest share of black voters in Nevada went to Mr. Sanders, 28%, followed by Ms. Warren at 12%.

Ms. Klobuchar and Ms. Buttigieg trailed far behind with black voters at 3% and 2%, respectively.

Mr. Biden, who campaign has limped through the first few contests, has consistently led in support among black voters, which will be a boon when the race moves next to South Carolina.

Mr. Biden also led in support among voters over 65, which accounted for roughly 27% of the turnout. Mr. Sanders dominated every other age group.

Among households with union members, which was supposed to be a strength for Mr. Biden, the entrance polls showed Mr. Sanders with a big lead with that major force in Nevada politics.

Mr. Sanders was the pick of 36% of union households, trailed by Mr. Biden at 17%, Mr. Buttigieg at 15%, Ms. Warren at 11% and Ms. Klobuchar at 8%.

Mr. Sanders also dominated among non-union households with 35%, according to the entrance polls.

Mr. Sanders has been the choice of liberal voters since entering the race. Nevada voters showed his appeal to a broader electorate, edging out Mr. Biden for support among moderate or conservative Democratic voters.

Mr. Sanders got 24% of the vote from self-described moderates or conservatives, followed by Mr. Biden at 22%.

Mr. Buttigieg took 19% of the moderate vote, Ms. Klobuchar got 13% and Ms. Warren got 7%, according to the entrance polls.

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