- The Washington Times - Monday, September 21, 2020

Most Americans said they think the winner of November’s presidential election should fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court left by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, according to polling conducted over the weekend.

A majority, 62%, said the winner of the contest between President Trump and Democratic nominee Joseph R. Biden should fill the seat, compared to 23% who disagreed, according to the Reuters/Ipsos poll.

Eight in 10 Democrats and five in 10 Republicans said the confirmation process should wait until after the election.

The survey also found that 30% said Justice Ginsburg’s death would make them more likely to vote for Mr. Biden, 25% said it would make them more likely to vote for Mr. Trump, and 38% said it wouldn’t have an impact on their vote.

The president said Monday on Fox News that he will likely announce his Supreme Court pick on Friday or Saturday.



White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Monday that Mr. Trump will push forward and that the announcement of his nominee will “very likely” come before Wednesday.

“We believe that voters will be supportive of this move as we move forward and they see the quality of our nominee,” she said on CBS.

Two Republican senators — Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — have said the confirmation process should wait until after the election.

Republicans hold a 53-47 majority in the Senate and can afford no more than three defections on whatever course they decide to take.

Some Democrats, meanwhile, have called for adding seats to the court if Republicans press forward and Democrats retake control of the Senate after the November election.

Democrats have cited Republicans’ blockade of Judge Merrick Garland, who was nominated to the high court in March 2016, as reason to pump the brakes.

Republicans say that situation was different because the White House and Senate were controlled by different parties.

The online survey of 1,006 American adults was taken on Saturday and Sunday and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

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