- The Washington Times - Wednesday, March 3, 2021

If one were just to listen to the mainstream media, you’d believe what happened on Jan. 6th at the nation’s Capitol was an armed insurrection, a failed coup attempt by radical Trump supporters to overthrow the government, which ended in multiple law-enforcement deaths.

However, the more we learn about that day’s events, the more this narrative seems to fall apart.

An FBI official testified before the Senate today and admitted no firearms were recovered from the Capitol on Jan 6th and that no one has been charged with any firearm offense.

How can you have an “armed insurrection,” if no one was actually brandishing any firearms? Yet the Washington Post, PolitiFact and CNN, all ran with such definitions in what can only be defined as a coordinated misinformation campaign to make the riot seem as nefarious as possible.

Another misrepresentation was Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick’s death. It was reported by multiple news outlets, including the New York Times, that Mr. Sicknick was bludgeoned to death with a fire extinguisher. 



The Times report on Mr. Sicknick’s death was widely wielded by partisans as the No.1 reason why then former president Donald J. Trump must be impeached. It was cited in the House Democrats impeachment pretrial memo, and the article of impeachment itself stated that Trump supporters “injured and killed law enforcement personnel.”

Yet, it too was false reporting.

Mr. Sicknick’s mother told the Daily Mail the family believed he passed away because of a stroke the following day. ProPublica interviewed Mr. Sicknick’s brother, who said that “Sicknick had texted [the family] Wednesday night to say that while he had been pepper-sprayed, he was in good spirits.” 

And on Sunday, the Times quietly updated their reporting to say it wasn’t blunt force that killed Mr. Sicknick, but perhaps an adverse reaction to bear spray.

Instead of clarifying what exactly happened to Mr. Sicknick, FBI Director Chris Wray declined to give any details of Mr. Sicknick’s death.

“There is an ongoing investigation into his death,” Mr. Wray said yesterday. “We’re not at a point where we can disclose or confirm the cause of death.”

Why not? How would releasing the details of Mr. Sicknick’s death impair any ongoing investigation? CNN reported in early February, the FBI was having difficulty in building a murder case for Mr. Sicknick – perhaps because he wasn’t murdered.

Yet, Mr. Sicknick’s bludgeoning death was hyped relentlessly by the news media after the Times original report – perhaps because it was the only example, they could find of anyone being killed by the Trump mob. 

None of the other four deaths on Jan. 6th were at the hands of pro-Trump protesters.

Ashli Babbitt was an unarmed protester who was shot in the neck by a police officer. Kevin Greeson died of a heart attack outside the Capitol, Benjamin Philips died of stroke, and Rosanne Boyland was inadvertently killed in a crush of other rioters to fight through a police line. 

As journalist Glenn Greenwald pointed out: “Without Sicknick having his skull bashed in with a fire extinguisher, there were no deaths that day that could be attributed to deliberate violence by pro-Trump protesters. Three weeks later, The Washington Post said dozens of officers (a total of 140) had various degrees of injuries, but none reported as life-threatening, and at least two police officers committed suicide after the riot. So Sicknick was the only person killed who was not a pro-Trump protester, and the only one deliberately killed by the mob itself.”

That’s why it was hyped. That’s why the media didn’t bother to check the facts of his case before running with their narrative. It was their intention to sensationalize the events of Jan. 6th to make them as bloody and nefarious as possible.  Because orange man bad.

The more we learn about the actual events on Jan. 6th we’re learning exactly how much misinformation was being spewed by the mainstream media, and was being lapped up by gullible partisan hacks.

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