- The Washington Times - Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Ahead of MLB’s Opening Day, President Biden on Wednesday said professional baseball should consider moving the league’s All-Star game out of Georgia over the state’s newly enacted election law, which Mr. Biden described as “Jim Crow on steroids.”

Mr. Biden was asked about recent comments from Tony Clark, the head of the players union, who said it’s worth having a conversation about moving the game.

“I think today’s professional athletes are acting incredibly responsibly,” Mr. Biden said in an interview with ESPN. “I would strongly support them doing that. People look to them - they’re leaders.”

“This is Jim Crow on steroids what they’re doing in Georgia and 40 other states,” the president said.

Anchor Sage Steele had asked: “What do you think about the possibility that baseball decides to move their All-Star game out of Atlanta because of this political issue?”



Among other changes, the new election law cuts down on the time to request absentee ballots, sets new rules for ballot drop boxes, and adds a voter ID requirement to request and vote absentee.

“Imagine them passing a law saying you cannot provide water or food for someone standing in line to vote? Can’t do that?” the president said. “Come on. Or you’re going to close a polling place at 5:00 when working people just get off? This is all about keeping working folks and ordinary folks that I grew up with from being able to vote.”

The new law bars people from handing out food or water to voters who are within a certain distance from a polling place or who are in line to vote, though verified poll workers can make water available to people waiting in line.

The Washington Post fact-checker has given Mr. Biden the dreaded “Four Pinocchios” for his statements about ending voting at 5:00 and cutting voting hours early.

Republicans say the new requirements are needed after the post-election chaos in Georgia that saw multiple recounts in the race between Mr. Biden and former President Trump. Mr. Biden carried the state by about 12,000 votes.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Manage Newsletters

Copyright © 2021 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Please read our comment policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide