- The Washington Times - Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Marcus Lamb, founder of Daystar TV, died Tuesday, the evangelical Christian network announced on Twitter. He was 64.

“It’s with a heavy heart we announce that Marcus Lamb, president and founder of Daystar Television Network, went home to be with the Lord this morning,” the announcement read. “The family asks that their privacy be respected as they grieve this difficult loss. Please continue to lift them up in prayer.”

A Religion News Service report said Mr. Lamb, noted for opposition to vaccines against COVID-19, died after a weeks-long battle against the novel coronavirus.

Daystar had reportedly broadcast programs opposing vaccination and featuring noted skeptic Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. 

In announcing his illness, Lamb‘s wife Joni said her husband had diabetes, RNS reported. Diabetes is believed to be a comorbidity which can make recovery from COVID-19 more difficult.



The Dallas-based network announcement did not indicate a cause of death. The Washington Times has asked Daystar for additional information.

Mr. Lamb, an ordained bishop in the Church of God, launched Daystar Television in 1997 as an outgrowth of a Christian television station he and his wife established in Dallas, Texas, seven years earlier. The venture’s first broadcast featured televangelist Bishop T.D. Jakes, also based in Dallas.

It claims to be “the fastest-growing faith-based television network in the world,” available on every major cable and satellite system in the United States and in 200 nations overseas.

Daystar also operates 70 television stations and claims to reach 680 million households globally.

Born Oct. 7, 1957, in Cordele, Georgia, Mr. Lamb enrolled in Lee University in Cleveland, Tennessee, graduating magna cum laude. He married Joni Trammell in 1982, and they traveled as evangelists before entering Christian broadcasting.

Christian media expert Phil Cooke, co-founder and CEO of Cooke Media Group and author of “Maximize Your Influence,” said Mr. Lamb “had a remarkable vision” for what Christian television could accomplish.

“I first visited Marcus when Daystar was operating out of a converted grocery store outside Dallas,” Mr. Cooke said via email.

He said Mr. Lamb “was convinced using the platform of television was critical for sharing the gospel in a media-driven culture. His insight proved correct, and today, the influence of Daystar is felt around the world.”

According to the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, Mr. Lamb “changed the world and the Kingdom of God. I am grateful for his influence in my life and the millions he touched with the love of Christ. … Marcus Lamb’s life shone brightly to the glory of God.”

• Mark A. Kellner can be reached at mkellner@washingtontimes.com.

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