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Iran's President Hassan Rouhani waits for Turkey's parliament speaker and former Prime Minister, Binali Yildirim, for their meeting, after a six-nation conference on fighting terrorism in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi) ** FILE **

Iran’s ‘corruption courts’ fuel surge in executions

- The Washington Times

The embattled Iranian government is increasingly resorting to the most severe punishment — execution — as it tries to tamp down a wave of financial crimes amid an economic downturn fueled in part by tough U.S. sanctions, according to activists and human rights groups.

Fighting in Yemeni city dies down as cease-fire takes hold

- Associated Press

Yemen’s key port city of Hodeida was calm Tuesday morning, hours after a U.N.-mediated cease-fire went into effect between government-allied forces and the country’s rebels, Yemeni officials said.

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Boys run up the stairs at a rehabilitation center for former child soldiers in Marib, Yemen, in this July 25, 2018, photo. Boys come to center traumatized and mistrustful from their experiences on the battlefield. On his first day at the center, one said he was terrified, unsure what they would do to him. "But then I saw the teachers and they gave me a room to stay in. I felt good after that." (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Children fight, kill and die in Yemen's civil war

- Associated Press

At the age of 13, Mohammed was an unflinching fighter for Yemen's Houthi rebels. Indoctrinated in their camps, he went into battle even as gunfire filled the air and the earth shook from airstrikes. He says he tortured and killed. He didn't care if he lived or died.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., left, and Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, right, arrives to speak to reporters about the possibility of a partial government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018. Congress and President Donald Trump continue to bicker over his demand that lawmakers fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, pushing the government to the brink of a partial shutdown at midnight Friday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Funding government without border wall appears back on table

- Associated Press

President Donald Trump appeared to back off his demand for $5 billion to build a border wall, signaling for the first time that he might be open to a deal that would avoid a partial government shutdown.

In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, residents line up inside the Artux City Vocational Skills Education Training Service Center at the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

US reviews report of imports from forced labor in China camp

- Associated Press

The U.S. government said Tuesday that it is reviewing reports of forced labor at a Chinese internment camp where ethnic minorities are sewing clothes that have been shipped to the U.S. market.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., left, and Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, right, arrives to speak to reporters about the possibility of a partial government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018. Congress and President Donald Trump continue to bicker over his demand that lawmakers fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, pushing the government to the brink of a partial shutdown at midnight Friday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Shutdown threat recedes as Trump softens stance on wall

- Associated Press

President Donald Trump appeared Tuesday to back off his demand for $5 billion to build a border wall, signaling for the first time that he might be open to a deal that would avoid a partial government shutdown.

New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, from left, Texas Reps. Joaquin Castro and Al Green gather before the media after a facility tour at the Border Patrol Station in Lordsburg, N.M., Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018. Jakelin Caal, 7, and her father were found Dec. 6 along with more than 160 others in a desolate New Mexico region, some 90 miles away from the Border Patrol facility where they were taken into custody. Caal later died. (Roberto E. Rosales/The Albuquerque Journal via AP)

Lawmakers call for probe into Guatemalan child's death

Associated Press

Lawmakers visiting the Border Patrol station where a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl was taken hours before her death demanded an independent investigation Tuesday into the response by federal agents.

Claudia Maquin, 27, shows a photo of her daughter, Jakelin Amei Rosmery Caal Maquin in Raxruha, Guatemala, on Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018. The 7-year-old girl died in a Texas hospital, two days after being taken into custody by border patrol agents in a remote stretch of New Mexico desert. (AP Photo/Oliver de Ros)

Officials baffled by large migrant groups at remote crossing

- Associated Press

Large numbers of Guatemalan families and unaccompanied children are surrendering to U.S. immigration agents in an extremely remote and dangerous stretch of New Mexico desert, a new smuggling route that has baffled authorities.

FILE - In this June 21, 2018, file photo, an agent with the Department of Homeland Security controls access to a holding facility for immigrant children in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration is reversing a policy that required fingerprinting for all adults living in a household where a migrant child would live. Parents and other sponsors have said the fingerprinting rule had slowed placement of children in homes, in part because some members of the household were afraid to be fingerprinted. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton, File)

US reverses policy on migrant children's sponsors

- Associated Press

The Trump administration is changing the way it reviews sponsors who want to care for migrant children in government custody - backing off a requirement that all people in the house are fingerprinted.

A Customs and Border Patrol agent patrols the international border Tuesday, April 10, 2018 in Nogales, Ariz. The Republican governors of Texas, Arizona and New Mexico on Monday committed 1,600 Guard members to the border, giving President Donald Trump many of the troops he requested to fight what he's called a crisis of migrant crossings and crime. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Border Patrol discovers tunnel being dug to connect U.S., Mexico

Associated Press

Authorities say an incomplete tunnel has been found under the U.S.-Mexico border in Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora. The U.S Border Patrol said Tuesday the presence of structural shoring and digging tools in the tunnel when it was discovered Monday indicated that its excavation was still in progress.

Honduran asylum seekers are taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents after the group crossed the U.S. border wall into San Diego, California, seen from Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Dec. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

A look at status of Trump's US-Mexico border wall

- Associated Press

President Donald Trump and Democratic lawmakers are in a standoff over funding the government, and the main sticking point is Trump's demand for $5 billion to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.