American Scene

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The gun ordinance that went into effect Monday allows Chicagoans to have handguns in their homes for protection but imposes restrictions and regulations.

It permits people to have guns inside their homes but forbids them from taking their firearms outside, even onto the porch, into the yard or the garage.

It also calls for prospective gun owners to take a class and receive firearm training. Chicago residents must leave the city to buy guns because the ordinance prohibits gun sales in the city.

NEW YORK

Questions raised about mosque

NEW YORK | The ranking Republican on the House Homeland Security Committee said Monday he favors an investigation into the funding of a proposed mosque near ground zero.

In an interview with the Associated Press, Rep. Peter King raised concerns about the sources of funding for the proposed $100 million mosque, just blocks away from the site of the Sept. 11 attacks, where nearly 3,000 Americans died at the hands of Islamic terrorists.

“It’s a house of worship, but we are at war with al Qaeda,” Mr. King told the AP. “I think the 9/11 families have a right to know where the funding comes from; I think there are significant questions.”

The mosque is a project of the American Society for Muslim Advancement and the Cordoba Institute, which promotes cross-cultural understanding between Islam and the West. Cordoba’s director, Imam Faisel Abdul Rauf, has refused to disclose the sources of funding for the mosque and once suggested in a television interview that U.S. policies contributed to the 9/11 attacks.

Mr. King’s views differ from those of New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, who said Monday it would be un-American to investigate the mosque. Mr. Bloomberg, a Republican-turned-independent, has backed the mosque since the project came under development, as do numerous other community and political leaders including Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, the Democratic nominee for governor.

OHIO

Pekar, a comic book writer, dies

CLEVELAND | Harvey Pekar, whose autobiographical comic book series “American Splendor” portrayed his unglamorous life with bone-dry honesty and wit, was found dead at home early Monday, authorities said. He was 70.

The cause of death was not clear, and an autopsy was planned, officials said. Mr. Pekar had prostate cancer, asthma, high blood pressure and depression, said Michael Cannon, a police captain in suburban Cleveland Heights.

Officers were called to Mr. Pekar’s home by his wife about 1 a.m., Mr. Cannon said. His body was found on the floor between a bed and dresser. He had gone to bed around 4:30 p.m. Sunday in good spirits, his wife told police.

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