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Anderson’s plaque in Cooperstown calls him “the crank that turned the Big Red Machine,” and his players agree that it fit. Bench noted that Anderson treated his players respectfully and was always on top of game strategy.

“It’s a lot like a chess game, and Sparky was a chess master,” Bench said.

Anderson won four National League pennants in Cincinnati from 1970-78, then was stung when the Reds fired him after consecutive second-place finishes. Anderson took his disappointment to the other league and won there, too, directing the Tigers to the 1984 championship and a division title in 1987.

He refused to manage replacement players during baseball’s labor dispute in spring training of 1995, angering owner Mike Ilitch. He resigned after a 60-win season, saying the franchise needed a new direction. He hoped to manage somewhere else, but when an offer never came along, he retired.

He was voted into Cooperstown by the Veterans Committee.

Even then, he showed his usual self-deprecation. Anderson had refused to set foot inside the Hall until 2000 because he felt unworthy.

“I didn’t ever want to go into the most precious place in the world unless I belonged,” Anderson said.

Survivors include his wife, Carol; sons Lee and Albert; daughter Shirley Englebrecht; and nine grandchildren.

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AP Sports Writer Larry Lage in Detroit contributed to this report.