Gadhafi’s wife, daughter and sons flee to Algeria

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Moammar Gadhafi’s second wife, two sons and a daughter arrived in Algeria on Monday as rebels closed in on the Libyan dictator’s last stronghold.

A statement carried by Algeria’s official news agency, APS, said Col. Gadhafi’s wife, Sofia; his daughter Aisha; and sons Hannibal and Mohammed, accompanied by their children, had “entered Algeria at 8:45 a.m. through the Algerian-Libyan border.”

A spokesman for the rebels’ National Transitional Council said it will demand that the Gadhafis be handed back to Libya to stand trial.

The rebels put Mohammed Gadhafi under house arrest last week, but he escaped in a firefight.

There was no word on the whereabouts of Col. Gadhafi and his three other sons, Seif al-Islam, Mutassim and Khamis.

In Qatar, Mustafa Abdel-Jalil, chairman of the rebels’ National Transitional Council, said Col. Gadhafi still poses a threat to Libya.

Gadhafi’s defiance of the coalition forces still poses a danger, not only for Libya but for the world,” . That is why we are calling for the coalition to continue its support,” he said at a meeting in the Qatari capital, Doha.

The rebels have offered a $1.7-million-dollar reward for Col. Gadhafi’s capture, dead or alive.

Seif al-Islam, the one-time heir apparent to his father, was last seen when he made a surprise appearance at a Tripoli hotel in the early hours of Aug. 23.

Khamis Gadhafi heads the elite 32nd Brigade, also known as the Khamis Brigade, which has been accused of wide-scale atrocities in the conflict.

Mutassim Gadhafi served as national security adviser in his father’s regime.

Rebels have claimed repeatedly that Algeria has been supporting Col. Gadhafi’s regime with weapons, military aircraft and mercenaries since the start of their uprising in February.

Algeria and Syria were the only countries in the Arab League to vote against supporting a no-fly zone over Libya.

A spokeswoman for the Algerian Embassy in Washington denied the allegations.

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About the Author
Ashish Kumar Sen

Ashish Kumar Sen

Ashish Kumar Sen is a reporter covering foreign policy and international developments for The Washington Times.

Prior to joining The Times, Mr. Sen worked for publications in Asia and the Middle East. His work has appeared in a number of publications and online news sites including the British Broadcasting Corp., Asia Times Online and Outlook magazine.

 

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