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“It was tremendous,” Jeter’s father, Charles, told the YES Network. “I can’t describe how I was feeling. We need a victory, first of all. … Very emotional for me, very happy for him.”

All the Yankees greats left their distinct marks. Babe Ruth set the home run record, Lou Gehrig became the Iron Horse, Joe DiMaggio hit in 56 straight games, Yogi Berra won the most championships, Mickey Mantle launched the longest drives. They all won World Series rings, certainly, with Jeter owning five.

The 3,000 hits, that will be Jeter’s legacy forever.

“I want to give him a big hug. It’s an absolute wonderful accomplishment,” Berra said in a statement.

Whenever Jeter retires, a plaque in Monument Park is guaranteed to follow. Someday, he’ll surely have a monument, too. Because on the list of monumental baseball achievements, this ranks up there.

Along with 28 players with 3,000 hits, there are 25 members of the 500-homer club and 23 pitchers in the 300-win circle. And the Yankees: They’ve got 27 World Series championships.

Jeter desperately wanted to achieve the mark at home, and the Yankees only had two games left in the Bronx before the All-Star break, with an eight-game road trip looming to start the second half.

“I felt a lot of pressure to do it here,” he said, joking that, “I was lyin’” when he said it didn’t matter much.

Girardi wasn’t worried about Jeter trying too hard.

“He’s never had a problem with pressure in his life,” Girardi said before the game.

As always, Jeter walked to the plate after a recorded introduction by late, longtime Yankee Stadium public address announcer Bob Sheppard. His intonation of “Deh-rick Jee-tuh” has been imitated over the years by thousands of Yankees fans, if not millions.

Jeter smiled after his first hit as the sellout crowd of 48,103 roared. That singled came on a full count.

“He could’ve thrown it in the dugout and I would’ve swung,” Jeter said.

The crowd sensed history was on deck when Jeter came up next. There was a buzz when he stepped into the batter’s box _ Jeter loves to put up his right arm to ask the umpire for time.

As the at-bat built, there was a hush each time Price went into his windup.

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