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“I will probably be the first Polish foreign minister in history to say so, but here it is,” Radek Sikorski said in Berlin. “I fear German power less than I am beginning to fear German inactivity. … The biggest threat to the security and prosperity of Poland would be the collapse of the eurozone.”

Eurozone countries have enormous debts that must be refinanced — with 638 billion euros ($852 billion) coming due in 2012, of which 40 percent needs to be refinanced in the first four months alone, according to Barclays Capital.

The 17 ministers also are discussing jointly issuing so-called eurobonds — an all-for-one, one-for-all way of having the different countries guaranteeing one another’s debts.

Right now, each nation issues its own bonds, meaning that while Italy pays above 7 percent, Germany pays about 2 percent. Having stronger countries such as Germany stand behind the general European debt would lower Italy’s borrowing rates and perhaps help it avoid a debt spiral toward bankruptcy. At the same time, it would raise Germany’s borrowing costs.

An even more radical solution was proposed Tuesday by the head of Germany’s exporters association: urging Greece and Portugal to leave the eurozone. BGA President Anton Boerner told the Associated Press that’s the only way those two nations can spur the growth needed to overcome their crippling debts.

Analysts were doubtful that new cash for Greece and mere talk about the stability fund would bring the financial relief that Europe craves.

“The marginal impact of these bits of ‘good news’ should be limited at best, and investors will still cast a nervous eye towards this week’s bond auctions,” said Geoffrey Yu, an analyst at UBS.

Angela Charlton in Paris, Melissa Eddy and Juergen Baetz in Berlin, Pan Pylas in London and Greg Keller in Brussels contributed to this report.