‘Battleship’ leads attack of game-based movies

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On the surface, little about “Battleship” the movie resembles the board game.

In the game, players call out letters and numbers that correspond to their opponents’ grid, hoping to hit and sink a set of ships hidden there.

In the movie, alien ships burst out of their hiding place in the ocean and trap some battleships under a giant force field inside which the two sides must duke it out. The aliens appear to have weapons with distinctly peg-like shapes, along with some spinning metal balls of death known as “shredders,” which were not part of the board game.

Hasbro has that little wrinkle covered.

The company is releasing a new version of the game using cards that enable the wielder to wipe out a whole row or column of their opponents’ pieces, offering kids a way to relive the experience of the movie at home.

The mind-numbing array of toy-related movies might have some people groaning. That doesn’t mean the trend will end any time soon.

“The parents can get fatigued, but children don’t,” says Jim Silver, editor in chief of toy-reviewing website TimetoPlayMag.com, who says parents usually succumb to their children’s demands for movie-related toys.

“If you take three kids to the movies and they love it, and they want to have that play experience at home … chances are parents are going to buy it. However, if they never see the movie, then that’s a different story.” Battleship debuts in the U.S. on May 18.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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