- - Monday, January 16, 2012

OREGON

Zappos says customer database hacked

PORTLAND — Online shoe seller Zappos.com says a hacker may have accessed the personal information of up to 24 million customers.

Customers’ credit card and payment information was not stolen, but names, phone numbers, email addresses, billing and shipping addresses, the last four digits from credit cards, and more may have been accessed in the attack, according to an email CEO Tony Hsieh sent Sunday to employees.

Zappos is contacting customers by email and urging them to change their passwords.

Zappos said the hacker gained access to its internal network and systems through one of the company’s servers in Kentucky. Zappos is based in Las Vegas. It is owned by Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc.

“We’ve spent over 12 years building our reputation, brand, and trust with our customers,” Mr. Hsieh wrote in his email. “It’s painful to see us take so many steps back due to a single incident. I suppose the one saving grace is that the database that stores our customers’ critical credit card and other payment data was not affected or accessed.”

89,000 BMW Minis may have faulty pump

PORTLAND — BMW of North America is voluntarily recalling nearly 89,000 Mini vehicles because of a water pump malfunction that could cause a fire.

The company says in a regulatory filing Monday that the water pump that cools the turbocharger in some of its cars has a circuit board that can malfunction and overheat. That could cause smoldering and potentially a fire.

No accidents or injuries have been reported. BMW will replace the pump at no cost to owners.

The recall applies to 2007-2011 models of the Mini Cooper S, 2008-2011 Cooper S Clubman, 2009-2011 Cooper S Convertible and 2011 Cooper S Countryman. It also includes the 2009-2011 models of the Mini JCW, JCW Clubman and JCW Convertible.

PENNSYLVANIA

Electric plants shift from coal to gas

PITTSBURGH — The huge, belching smokestacks of electric power plants have long symbolized air pollution woes. But U.S. government statistics show that a shift is under way: More and more electric plants around the nation are being fueled by natural gas, which is far cleaner than coal, the traditional fuel.

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