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On Monday, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett ordered the state’s flags lowered to half-staff through Paterno’s burial.

In recent weeks, university leaders have indicated they intend to honor Paterno’s contributions on and off the field _ a sharp contrast to tones sounded in the frantic first week of the scandal. Back then, for instance, school President Rodney Erickson said Paterno was welcome to football games just like any other member of the public.

Paterno won two national championships and a Division I record 409 victories to turn Penn State into a name-brand program. Off the field, Paterno and his wife, Sue, donated millions back to the university, including the library.

“His and Sue’s contributions are as much about ensuring student success as the many endowments and the library bearing the Paterno name,” said Barbara Dewey, Penn State’s dean of University Libraries.

Memorial service and funeral plans weren’t ready yet Sunday night, though it appeared the family and the school were coordinating efforts.

Perhaps one last chance to say goodbye for a Penn State community that often took its cues on fall weekends from JoePa.

“No matter what people say, you can’t take away what he did for Penn State and college football,” former cornerback D’Anton Lynn said. “I don’t think there will ever be a college coach that will ever have that impact again.”