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“I think that’s one of what was important to us when Jared came here,” Matta said. “We knew he was going to be a special player. And to see him get these accolades he has received and won at the level he’s won at speaks volumes to the player he is and that select category and only being a sophomore let’s you know what a great player he is.”

Davis burst onto the national scene as part of the Wildcats team that spent most of the season ranked No. 1 in the poll and then entered the NCAA tournament as the overall No. 1 seed. The 6-10 Davis was chosen the Southeastern Conference Defensive Player of the Year after averaging 14.3 points, 10 rebounds and 4.6 blocks while shooting 64.2 percent from the field.

The last Wildcats to be first-team selections were freshmen John Wall and DeMarcus Cousins in 2010. At least one freshman has been on the first team five of the last six years.

“It means a lot, especially for a freshman,” Davis said before admitting he surprised himself this season. “I thought I would just come in here and hit a couple of shots, block a couple of shots, get a couple of dunks. I never thought I would be this successful in college.”

He said he has been successful because of opportunities.

“My teammates have been doing a great job of giving me the ball,” he said. “And basically, all the teams that were driving inside, giving me a chance to get blocks. We’re just out there having fun.”

The 6-7 Green averaged 16.1 points, 10.4 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 1.5 steals while doing everything the Spartans needed on the way to sharing the Big Ten regular season title, winning the conference tournament and being a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament.

He is Michigan State’s fourth first-team selection joining Magic Johnson, Shawn Respert and Mateen Cleaves.

“It’s an honor because those are the guys who I looked up to, paved the way for me, starting with Magic and going to Respert and Cleaves,” Green said. “Those guys, every time I walk into the gym I see their names up in the rafters and that’s a goal that everyone has who’s playing. Just being mentioned in the same sentence with those guys means a lot. All of them are winners, all of them are great players and all of them are successful and great people.”

McDermott is Creighton’s first All-America and he joins three-time selection Pete Maravich of LSU as All-Americas coached by their fathers.

The 6-7 sophomore was third in Division I in scoring with a 23.2 average. He averaged 8.2 rebounds and shot 61 percent from the field, including 49.5 percent from 3-point range.

“It’s really special. It really hasn’t hit me yet. Later down the road it will,” McDermott said of his selection. “It’s something real cool to be in the company of some of those names. Creighton never had one. It’s really cool to be able to be the first, especially with all the great players who have been at Creighton over the years.”

Coaching a son who is the star of the team did bring about a different problem for Greg McDermott.

“It could be a situation where if your son was a borderline player that your fans get upset if you put him in the game,” he said. “Our fans get upset if I take him out.”

Junior guard Isaiah Canaan of Murray State was joined on the second team by seniors Marcus Denmon of Missouri, Tyler Zeller of North Carolina, Jae Crowder of Marquette and Kevin Jones of West Virginia.

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