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NBC Sports said Mr. Bell will become executive producer of NBC’s Olympics coverage, a role he took on this summer for the network’s successful coverage of the London Olympics.

The “Today” show had a 17-year winning streak in the morning ratings, the last six under Mr. Bell’s tutelage. But its ABC competitors made inroads this spring and after the decision was made in June to have Savannah Guthrie replace Mrs. Curry as Matt Lauer’s co-anchor, “Today” has fallen consistently behind in the ratings. The only exception was when NBC was in London for the Olympics, though “Today” recently has been closing the gap with “Good Morning America.”

Mr. Bell came forward several weeks ago to say that removing Ms. Curry was his decision. At the time, many viewers seemed to think Mr. Lauer was involved.

The change at the morning news show was first reported by The New York Times.

Victoria’s Secret apologizes for using headdress

Victoria’s Secret has apologized for putting an American Indian-style headdress on a model for its annual fashion show, after the outfit was criticized as a display of ignorance about tribal culture and history.

The company responded to the complaints over the weekend by saying it was sorry to have upset anyone and it wouldn’t include the outfit in the show’s television broadcast next month or in any marketing materials, The Associated Press reports.

“We sincerely apologize, as we absolutely had no intention to offend anyone,” the company said.

Headdresses historically are a symbol of respect, worn by American Indian war chiefs and warriors. For many Plains tribes, for example, each feather placed on a headdress has significance and had to be earned through an act of compassion or bravery.

Victoria’s Secret model Karlie Kloss walked onto the runway last week wearing a floor-length feathered headdress, leopard-print underwear and high heels. She also was adorned with fringe and turquoise jewelry during a segment meant to represent the 12 months of the year.

Ms. Kloss posted on Twitter that she was “deeply sorry if what I wore during the VS Show offended anyone.”

Thousands of people have commented about the outfit on the company’s Facebook page. Some praised Ms. Kloss’ attire as artistic and urged those offended by it to “get over it.” Some expressed appreciation to Victoria’s Secret for halting its marketing approach for the clothing, and others reached back in history to explain their feelings.

“We have gone through the atrocities to survive and ensure our way of life continues,” Navajo Nation spokesman Erny Zah said in an interview Monday. “Any mockery, whether it’s Halloween, Victoria’s Secret — they are spitting on us. They are spitting on our culture, and it’s upsetting.”

The Victoria’s Secret stir follows a string of similar incidents. Recently, Paul Frank Industries Inc. and the band No Doubt each ran into criticism for their use of headdresses in clothing and parties, and in a cowboys-and-Indians-themed video, respectively. They offered apologies as well.