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“I don’t think Occupy itself has an enormous future,” said Mark Naison, a professor at Fordham University in New York City. “I think that movements energized by Occupy have an enormous future.”

Across the nation, there have been protests organized in the name of ending foreclosure, racial inequality, stop and frisk, debt: You name it, Occupy has claimed it. Occupy the Bronx. Occupy the Department of Education. Occupy the Hood. Occupy the Hamptons.

Protesters opposing everything from liquor sales in Whiteclay, Neb., to illegal immigration in Birmingham, Ala., have used Occupy as a weapon to fight for their own causes. In Russia, opposition activists protesting President Vladimir Putin’s re-election to a third term have held a series of Occupy-style protests. Young “indignados” in Spain are joining unions and public servants to rally against higher taxes and cuts to public education and health care.

“All around the world, that youthful spirit of revolt is alive and well,” said Kalle Lasn, co-founder of Adbusters, the Canadian magazine that helped ignite the movement.