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“The ones on the market today are extremely safe,” said Dr. Mary Fournier, an adolescent-medicine specialist at Chicago’s Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, who praised the new recommendations. “That is what everybody should be telling their patients.”

She said she already recommends IUDs for her patients and is being trained in how to insert birth control implants.

Raine-Bennett, research director for women’s health at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, Calif., said she gets mixed reactions from her patients about both methods.

“Some of them say, `Great! Something that I don’t have to think about.’ Others are, like, `Hmmm, something in my body?’ It really varies,” she said.

Doctors need to be sensitive to that and provide detailed information to dispel any myths and allow teens to make informed decisions, Raine-Bennett said.

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Online:

ACOG: http://www.acog.org

CDC birth control information: http://tinyurl.com/nhrf9p

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AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/LindseyTanner