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This was different.

When word leaked Te’o would speak at about noon, reporters immediately surrounded the podium. Over the next 25 minutes, rumors circulated that in a rare and possibly unprecedented move, Te’o’s agent would speak from the podium. That did not happen. There also was speculation that Te’o might deliver an opening statement like the then-injured Michael Crabtree did in 2009 and Cam Newton did two years later. That did not happen, either, though Te’o did make a closing statement in which he thanked his family, friends and fans for standing by him during this tumultuous month.

“It’s definitely embarrassing. You walk into grocery stores and people give you double takes to see if they’re staring at you,” he said before explaining he’s moved on. “If I was embarrassed, I wouldn’t be able to stand in front of you.”

The only thing that really matters in Indy, though, is what team officials think. Te’o said in the two formal interviews he’s had, with Green Bay and Houston, they have asked about the hoax. He has another 18 interviews left.

Will it hurt his draft position?

Former NFL executive Bill Polian, architect of four Super Bowl teams in Buffalo and two in Indianapolis, has been adamant that it won’t, and coaches and general managers seem to agree.

Most say they are more concerned with the red flags of other players — drug use, alcohol abuse, academic woes and even criminal allegations — than they are with Te’o’s tale.

“Somebody that’s not truthful, that’s big, to me. I’m a big fan of the `Judge Judy’ show. And when you lie in Judge Judy’s courtroom, it’s over. Your credibility is completely lost. You have no chance of winning that case,” San Francisco coach Jim Harbaugh said Friday. “I learned that from her. It’s very powerful, and true. Because if somebody does lie to you, how can you ever trust anything they ever say after that?”

Two questions later, he was asked whether that meant the reigning NFC champs would avoid Te’o in April’s draft.

“No. I wouldn’t say that,” Harbaugh said.

Te’o and the general public weren’t the only ones watching the interview session Saturday.

Team officials are taking notes, too.

“Honestly, it’s a distraction. If he can handle that distraction and still be able to perform on the football field, I really don’t think it makes that much of a difference,” Carolina coach Ron Rivera said before Te’o spoke. “We’ll talk about it, we’ll find out about it. The bottom line is, is he a good person and can he play football?”

On the field, Te’o’s is one of the top linebackers available.

Last season, he won the Maxwell Award, Bednarik Award, Butkus Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Lombardi Award and Walter Camp national player of the year and finished second in balloting for the Trophy.

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