Gay-marriage supporters turn focus to Illinois

See potential for 10th victory

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In other states:

Rhode Island lawmakers have introduced gay-marriage bills in both Democrat-led chambers. Gov. Lincoln Chafee, an independent, and Rhode Island House Speaker Gordon D. Fox, who is openly gay, support gay marriage; Senate President M. Teresa Paiva Weed does not. Rhode Island currently offers civil unions for same-sex couples.

Minnesota, where state Sen. Scott D. Dibble, a Democrat who is openly gay, has pledged to introduce a gay-marriage bill. In November, Minnesota voters rejected a traditional-marriage amendment and ended the Republican legislative majorities that put the amendment on the ballot. Minnesotans United for All Families, a pro-gay-marriage group, is urging lawmakers to pass a gay-marriage bill, and Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton has said he would sign it. Proponents of traditional marriage have promised not to give up the fight, despite their losses at the polls.

In Wyoming, state Rep. Cathy Connolly, a Democrat who is openly gay, said it’s likely a bill for gay marriage or civil unions will be introduced this year. “I think the time is right,” she told the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, citing gay-marriage victories in the states and federal level under the Obama administration. Republicans have supermajorities in both chambers.

In Indiana, lawmakers are slated to consider an amendment that would define marriage as the union of one man and one woman. The amendment passed the 2011 legislature, but must pass again in the next two years for it to be presented to voters in 2014. Republicans have supermajorities in both chambers.

In Pennsylvania, state Rep. Daryl Metcalfe, a Republican, has promised to introduce a state marriage amendment to keep marriage between one man and one woman. “Marriage is a common good, not a special interest. Special interests should not have the right to redefine marriage for all of us,” he said. Republicans control both chambers.

In New Jersey, lawmakers in Democrat-led chambers have until January 2014 to override Republican Gov. Chris Christie’s veto of a gay-marriage bill.

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