Topic - John S. Pistole

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Boxer questions TSA about San Jose stowaway

    A few weeks before a 15-year-old boy stowed away in the wheel well of a flight from California to Hawaii, the U.S. Transportation Security Administration conducted a review of San Jose's airport and found its perimeter to be in compliance with the agency's security requirements.

  • Faster airport-screening program expands to DFW

    Travelers can now apply at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport for clearance to keep their shoes, belts and light jackets on while passing through security screening.

  • House Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Rep. Bennie G. Thompson, D-Miss., speaks during a luncheon in Washington, Monday, Jan. 29, 2007. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)

    TSA defies audit, quietly expands behavior screening activity

    The government's chief auditor has urged TSA to cut its behavior screening program, but the agency instead quietly expanded it last month on passengers at Baltimore-Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport.

  • TSA rejects arming officers after LAX shooting

    The head of the Transportation Security Administration said Thursday his agency has officially rejected arming officers in response to a November attack at Los Angeles International Airport.

  • If the TSA's behavior-profiling program at airports is defunded, Administrator John S. Pistole said, "There would be fewer passengers going through expedited screening, there would be increased pat-downs, there would be longer lines and there would be more frustration by the traveling public." (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    TSA profiling at airports has yet to nab a terrorist

    The TSA's behavior-profiling program at airports has been in effect for seven years, but has yet to identify any potential terrorists who pose a threat to aviation, the agency's administrator acknowledged Thursday.

  • Illustration by Donna Grethen

    EDITORIAL: The price of dignity

    Frequent fliers can now pay $85 to avoid the indignity of a grope at the airport. (There's still no charge for a grope if that's what you want.)

  • The Homeland Security Department's inspector general said the Transportation Security Administration has not established any sense that agents are exercising good judgment in deciding which travelers they screen. (Associated Press)

    Agents' judgment faulted in TSA passenger screening

    The TSA's program to let agents pick out people for closer screening based on the agents' observation fails to meet basic standards of training of objectivity, according to a report released Wednesday by the agency's auditor.

  • **FILE** Volunteers pass through the first full body scanner, which uses backscatter technology, at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on March 10, 2010. Those airport scanners with their all-too revealing body images will soon be going away. The Transportation Security Administration says the X-ray scanners will be gone by June 2013 because the company that makes them can't fix the privacy issues. (Associated Press)

    TSA screenings lack objectivity, probe finds

    The TSA's program to let agents pick out people for closer screening based on the agents' observation fails to meet basic standards of training of objectivity, according to a report released Wednesday by the agency's auditor.

  • **FILE** Knives of all sizes and types are piled in a box at the State of Georgia Surplus Property Division store in Tucker, Ga., on Sept. 26, 2006, and are just a few of the hundreds of items discarded at the security checkpoints of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport that will be for sale at the store. (Associated Press)

    TSA drops plan to allow small knives on planes

    The head of the Transportation Security Administration says he's dropping a proposal that would have let airline passengers carry small knives, souvenir bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes.

  • John Pistole

    TSA chief: Screeners will keep targeting high-risk travelers

    Airport security screeners will increasingly focus on high-risk passengers, although unpopular screening measures — like random pat-downs, even for grannies and babies — are likely to continue for the time being, the head of the Transportation Security Administration said Monday.

  • ** FILE ** Jayashri Srikantiah, staff attorney with the ACLU of Northern California, holds up copies of records showing passengers checked on no-fly lists from San Francisco International Airport, as plaintiffs Jan Adams, right, and Rebecca Gordon, center, look on during a news conference in San Francisco, in this April 22, 2003, file photo. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

    U.S. No-Fly list doubles in 1 year

    Even as the Obama administration says it's close to defeating al Qaeda, the size of the government's secret list of suspected terrorists who are banned from flying to or within the United States has more than doubled in the past year, the Associated Press has learned.

  • Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

    PAUL: TSA's intrusions undermine security

    Today, while en route to Washington to speak to hundreds of thousands of people at the March for Life, I was detained by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) for not agreeing to a patdown after an irregularity was found in my full body scan. Despite removing my belt, glasses, wallet and shoes, the scanner and TSA also wanted my dignity. I refused.

  • **FILE** Airline passenger Don Heim (right) of Alpharetta, Ga., is briefed by Transportation Security Administration trainer Byron Gibson before going through a new expedited security line on Oct. 4, 2011, at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta. (Associated Press)

    TSA to expand test for faster airport security

    Transportation Security Administrator John Pistole said Wednesday that a small test program that pre-screens some travelers who volunteer extra information about themselves in exchange for swifter trips through airport security has been successful so far.

  • Transportation Security Administration chief John S. Pistole on Thursday welcomed the unionization of his agency's 47,000 airport screeners. The move has proved controversial, with critics arguing that, as a security agency, TSA should not allow collective bargaining. (Associated Press)

    TSA chief embraces unionization

    Transportation Security Administration chief John S. Pistole on Thursday welcomed the controversial unionization of his agency's 47,000 airport screeners.

  • Transportation Security Administration Administrator John S. Pistole testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, June 22, 2011, before a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing examining ongoing transportation security threats. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    Change made to airport screenings for youngsters

    The government has made a change in its policy for patting down young children at airport checkpoints, and more are promised.

More Stories →

Quotations
Happening Now