THE WASHINGTON TIMES | Stories - Washington Times
Skip to content

THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Articles by THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In this photo taken with light reflections on a pot German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends the weekly cabinet meeting of the German government at the chancellery in Berlin, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Frau Merkel's migraine

The reckoning is at hand for Angela Merkel in Germany. None of the political parties came close to winning a majority in the September voting, and trying to put together a workable coalition has given Frau Merkel — and Europe — a headache the size of a continent. Published November 23, 2017

Judiciary Committee members, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, left, talks with racking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on nominations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

'Packing' the judiciary

When what goes around comes around, only the quick and nimble escape a painful smackdown. The Democrats in California have had remarkable success over the years packing the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals with judges who have small appreciation for the Constitution as it was written, and now that may be changing. Published November 23, 2017

Presidency is not God

Former Vice President Joe Biden recently told Oprah Winfrey that in the last presidential election cycle he wasn't ready for the office. He asked, in quite biblical-sounding terms, "[W]as I prepared to be able to give my whole heart, my whole soul and all my attention to the endeavor? I knew I wasn't." In Mathew 22 Christ tells us, "You shall love the Lord your God with all of your heart, with all of your soul, and with all of your mind." Published November 23, 2017

Congress not upholding oaths

When congressional GOP members were elected in 2016, the entire Republican Party celebrated. Yet now these same people are considered traitors by many. Is that a little harsh? Readers can decide for themselves. I looked up the Merriam-Webster definition of a traitor, and here it is: "One who betrays another's trust or is false to an obligation or duty." I think that says it all. Published November 23, 2017

Turkeys, worms and Schadenfreude

Republicans and other conservatives who are tempted to indulge excessive Schadenfreude over the woes of Charlie Rose, Al Franken and their sordid fellows, taking delight in their pain and humiliation, should remember Iron Law of Politics No. 3, that nothing recedes like success. Giving too many hoots and hollers at turkeys over this holiday season is great fun, but the universal truth about worms is that they eventually turn. Published November 21, 2017

FILE - In this May 15, 2017 file photo, protesters hold signs during a demonstration against President Donald Trump's revised travel ban, outside a federal courthouse in Seattle. A Somali refugee living in Washington state is asking a federal judge to let his wife and young children join him in the U.S., saying the Trump administration's indefinite ban on allowing the families of refugees to enter the country violates immigration law. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Bordering on Obama-era dysfunction

Fidelity is scarce in Donald Trump's Washington, except among the not so loyal opposition. Whether owing to compassion or incompetence, the Trump administration one year on has failed to replace holdovers, leaving in place Barack Obama's people who are dedicated to obstruction and delay of the new era. In some federal departments, the greatest danger a bureaucrat faces is a paper cut. But about immigration, it's whether the laws enacted to protect the American people will be enforced. Published November 21, 2017

Look for torment in killers' pasts?

Whenever a large-scale atrocity is committed, society ought to look beyond the perpetrator's act and toward his motivation for committing the act, however abhorrent. This should be done with the goal of hopefully learning enough to prevent a future recurrence by another societal monster. Otherwise the great suffering that has been caused is essentially without positive purpose. Published November 21, 2017

Left resents Trump's success

Why do the Democrats want to impeach President Trump? Is it because he wants to keep America free, strong and safe? Or could it be that his presidency has caused the stock market to boom, businesses to come back to our shores and job numbers to rise? Published November 21, 2017

Bipartisanship needed on climate

Ben Wolfgang's coverage of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on Nov. 15 ("Republicans, Democrats brainstorm on plan to reduce greenhouse gas," Web) was a breath of fresh air. It's just this sort of bipartisan deliberation, combined with an understanding of public-private innovation and initiatives, that will help us going forward. The work we have ahead of us cannot be something that one party, one sector or one nation can undertake. Published November 21, 2017

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., center, arrives to speak to a large group of protesters rally against the Senate Republican healthcare bill on the East Front of the Capitol Building in Washington, Wednesday, June 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The season of the big slice

President Trump has something extra to be grateful for this Thanksgiving: a the long-awaited tax cut bill, passed by the House and en route to the Senate. As he marks the season with the traditional pardoning of the White House turkey, Republicans in line for similar clemency will get it only if the voters can find it in their hearts to forgive a plodding, inefficient (did someone say "incompetent"?) and lazybones Congress. Published November 20, 2017

Back on the list of bad guys

You can't blame North Korea for playing American presidents for willing suckers. A succession of them applied for the job. President Trump didn't, and Monday restored North Korea to a deserved place of prominence on the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. Published November 20, 2017

Thankful for capitalism

I was born on Chicago's south side, a stone's throw from the stockyards, in a melting-pot neighborhood. It was a place that did not have the word poverty in its vernacular. We lived in a cold-water, walk-up apartment quite typical for the type of neighborhood; a four- or five-story, wooden-frame building with four flats opening onto a common hallway on each floor. Our unit didn't have a front door (it had been missing for longer than any of the residents could recall). The doorway into the hallway was closed off with a patchwork quilt nailed to the upper edge of the door frame, and it extended a foot or so beyond both sides to ensure some privacy. Published November 20, 2017

Manson should've been executed

The news that Charles Manson, one of the most vicious, depraved and infamous killers, has died in prison at the ripe old age of 83 causes me to wonder how many millions of dollars have been spent over the past nearly half-century to keep him alive and provide for his needs and desires. These include legal representation for his trial and countless ludicrous and bizarre efforts to argue for parole, his housing, food, health-care needs, and other expenses through which he was a burden. Published November 20, 2017

FILE - In this May 14, 2012 file photo, King Salman, left, speaks with his son, now Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, (MBS), as they wait for Gulf Arab leaders ahead of the opening of Gulf Cooperation Council, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The surprise dismissal and arrest of dozens of ministers, royals, officials and senior military officers by MBS late Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017, is unprecedented in the secretive, 85-year-old kingdom. But so is the by-now virtually certain rise to the throne of a 30-something royal who, in another first, is succeeding his father. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)

Interesting times in Arabia

If hard times can make a monkey eat red pepper, as the ancient saying goes, tough times might require Arab and Jew to join forces to bring home the bacon. (Metaphorically speaking, of course.) The reformation of Islam, which stalled in Spain in the 16th century, might be struggling for renewed purchase in Saudi Arabia. Published November 19, 2017

In this April 4, 2012 photo made available by the University of Goteborg in Sweden, the Swedish research team practices before the operations to transplant wombs at the Sahlgrenska Hospital in Goteborg, Sweden. Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives and will soon try to become pregnant, the doctor in charge of the pioneering project has revealed. “This is a new kind of surgery,” Dr. Mats Brannstrom told The Associated Press. Brannstrom is leading the initiative at the University of Goteborg and will run workshops for other doctors on how to perform womb transplants later this year. “We have no textbook to look at,” he said.  (AP Photo/University of Goteborg, Johan Wingborg)

When two heads are better than one

China is thinking big. The Middle Kingdom has already built a small chain of islands in the South China Sea, fortifying them and bids to make them armed fortresses astride the sea lanes connecting Asia to the world. Leaders have to think big, and China obviously wants to replace the United States as the world's superpower. Published November 19, 2017

Players should thank Trump

What were the UCLA basketball players thinking as they were shoplifting merchandise from Louis Vuitton stores in Hangzhou, China? These three could have each gotten a 10-year sentence in a not-so-nice Chinese prison for their moronic stunt. They should thank their lucky stars President Trump was able to work with Chinese president Xi Jinping to secure custody release. Published November 19, 2017

GOP has chance to reform taxes

Too many Republicans excel at joining with Democrats on killing legislation and other critical issues. The Republicans, with a House and Senate majority, have an unprecedented opportunity to pass good, much-needed tax-reform legislation, with a transition period and provision for prompt revision if significant problems occur. Published November 19, 2017

Zimbabwe opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai speaks to the Associated Press after giving a press conference at his home in Harare, Zimbabwe, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017.  Tsvangirai said President Robert Mugabe must resign and called for a negotiated, inclusive transitional mechanism as well as comprehensive reforms before elections. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Coup in Zimbabwe

"Every great cause begins as a movement," the television philosopher Eric Hoffer once observed (maybe), "becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket." There's some dispute about whether Mr. Hoffer ever actually said it, but there's no dispute that it's an accurate description of what happened to the Zimbabwe of Robert Mugabe. Published November 16, 2017

NBC's Megyn Kelly interviews Juli Briskman, a former government contractor who was fired after she was photographed giving President Trump's motorcade the middle finger. (Image: "Megyn Kelly Today" screenshot)

The 100-grand salute

Salutes to the president can be monetized, and a middle-finger salute to a passing presidential motorcade can sometimes be worth more than a hundred grand. Is this a great country, or what? Published November 16, 2017

U.S. owes much to Washington, Lee

Being the great-great grandson of a Union soldier who gave the last full measure of devotion to preserve the Union in the bloodiest war in American history, I have a vested interest in the actions of the Alexandria Episcopal Church and the critics of Gen. Kelly's remarks about the Civil War. Published November 16, 2017