Topic - Kurmanbek Bakiyev

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Ex-Kyrgyz leader's son may be pawn in diplomacy

    This month's arrest of a deposed Kyrgyz president's son in London has generated speculation the he could become a bargaining chip in negotiations over a U.S. military base in this Central Asian country.

  • **FILE** Maksim Bakiyev, son of deposed Kyrgyz president Kurmanbek Bakiyev, is seen here Nov. 6, 2009, in the Kyrgyz capital of Bishkek. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyz suspect a deal in arrest of ex-president's son

    Last week's arrest of former Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiyev's son in London has generated speculation the he could become a bargaining chip in negotiations over a U.S. military base in this Central Asian country.

  • Kyrgyz students try to live on $100 a month

    Kyrgyzstan's online forums have buzzed with angry discussions about Economics Minister Akylbek Japarov since he told parliament in April that $100 is enough to live on for a month.

  • Kyrgyz Interior Ministry special force soldiers with their dogs march on Oct. 25, 2011, during a rehearsal ahead of presidential elections in Bishkek. Kyrgyzstan's presidential elections are scheduled for Oct. 30. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyz voters have little hope for change in Sunday election

    Kyrgyz voters go to the polls Sunday to elect a new president in what is seen as a landmark election in the region but what locals dismiss as not bringing real change to the country following last year's uprising.

  • **FILE** Kyrgyz soldiers conduct a foot patrol on June 20, 2010, in the village of Surattash, 10 miles from the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh, Kyrgyzstan, near the border of Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. (Associated Press)

    Upcoming election raises specter of terror in Kyrgyzstan

    The foiling of a terror plot by Islamic extremists in southern Kyrgyzstan over the weekend has underscored ethnic and regional tensions before presidential elections in Central Asia's only parliamentary democracy.

  • A Kyrgyz political party leader, Temir Sariyev, says the incoming coalition government likely will sharply raise the rent for a U.S. air base. (Associated Press)

    New Kyrgyz regime likely to raise U.S.'s rent

    The head of a leading party running for election in Kyrgyzstan said Thursday that an incoming coalition government would likely sharply increase the rent for a U.S. air base in the Central Asian country.

  • Kyrgyz government forces stop a bus with supporters of former presidential hopeful Urmat Baryktabasov who gathered on a highway some 9 miles east of the capital, Bishkek, on Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010, to demand the resignation of the government. The government forces used tear gas and stun grenades to disperse hundreds of protesters, raising fears of new instability in the turbulent Central Asian nation. (AP Photo)

    Kyrgyz troops fire on protesters, arrest leader

    Kyrgyz forces fired live ammunition, tear gas and stun grenades into the air to disperse hundreds of anti-government protesters Thursday and arrested their leader, raising fears of new instability in the turbulent Central Asian nation.

  • Illustration

    SIEFF: What went wrong in Kyrgyzstan - and what to do about it

    What went wrong in Kyrgyzstan? What is likely to happen next? What can the international community do to help prevent a recurrence of violence?

  • Ethnic Kyrgyz refugees and election commission officials pray after voting on a new constitution in Kyrgyzstan on Sunday. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyz leaders say constitution OK'd

    Barely two weeks after ethnic purges left many minority Uzbek communities in smoldering ruin, about two-thirds of Kyrgyzstan's voters went to the polls Sunday to peacefully and overwhelmingly approve a new constitution they hoped would bring stability to the Central Asian nation.

  • Ethnic Uzbek men push a truck as they build a barricade in the Uzbek district in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh on Thursday, June 17, 2010. Some 400,000 people have been displaced by ethnic violence in southern Kyrgyzstan, the United Nations announced Thursday, dramatically increasing the official estimate of a refugee crisis that has left throngs of desperate, fearful people without enough food and water in grim camps along the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    U.N.: 400,000 now uprooted by Kyrgyzstan unrest

    Some 400,000 people have been displaced by ethnic violence in southern Kyrgyzstan, the United Nations announced Thursday, dramatically increasing the official estimate of a crisis that has left throngs of desperate, fearful refugees without enough food and water in grim camps along the Uzbek border.

  • Kyrgyz soldiers and volunteers check passing cars and search passengers for weapons at a check point on the Uzbek border side on the outskirts of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh in Kyrgyzstan Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Heavy arms fire rang out over the Kyrgyz city of Osh before dawn Wednesday as authorities struggled to bring order to the country's south, which has been thrust into chaos by days of deadly ethnic riots. The violence has prompted more than 100,000 Uzbeks to flee for their lives to Uzbekistan, with tens of thousands more camped on the Kyrgyz side or stranded in a no man's land. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Kyrgyz army tries to get control in riot-hit south

    Kyrgyzstan's weak military attempted Wednesday to regain control of the city of Osh, a major transit point for Afghan heroin and the epicenter of ethnic violence that has driven much of the Uzbek population from the country's poor, rural south.

  • A Kyrgyz soldier searches a passenger for weapons at a checkpoint on the Uzbek border side on the outskirts of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh in Kyrgyzstan on Wednesday. Heavy arms fire rang out over Osh before dawn. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyzstan military seeks control in Osh

    Kyrgyzstan's weak military attempted Wednesday to regain control of the city of Osh, a major transit point for Afghan heroin and the epicenter of ethnic violence that has driven much of the Uzbek population from the country's poor, rural south.

  • Associated Press
Uzbeks mourn a victim of rioting between Kyrgyz and ethnic Uzbeks. Violence has left Kyrgyzstan's second-largest city, Osh, in smoldering ruins and sent more than 100,000 Uzbeks fleeing for their lives.

    Kyrgyz riots leave hundreds dead

    Rioting has killed several hundred people in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Tuesday, as new reports bolstered suspicions that the ethnic violence was deliberately ignited to undermine the interim government.

  • A Uzbek woman who fled the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh cries as she waits for permission to cross the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border into Uzbekistan on Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Uzbekistan closed the border Tuesday, leaving many camped out on the Kyrgyz side or stranded behind barbed-wire fences in no man's land. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    Red Cross: 'Several hundred' dead in Kyrgyz unrest

    Rioting has killed at least several hundred people in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, the Red Cross said Tuesday, as new reports strengthened suspicions that the violence was deliberately ignited to undermine the interim government.

  • Kyrgyzstan's deposed President Kurmanbek Bakiyev smiles as he speaks Tuesday during a press conference in the courtyard of his family home in the village of Teyit, in the Jalal-Abad region of southern Kyrgyzstan. Mr. Bakiyev said Tuesday he is willing to resign if his security is guaranteed. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyz president offers to leave

    Kyrgyzstan's deposed president said Tuesday he will resign if the interim authorities guarantee his security, and the head of the security services said he was ready to make such a promise.

More Stories →

Quotations
  • Since coming to power in 2005 amid street protests known as the Tulip Revolution, Mr. Bakiyev had ensured a measure of stability, but the opposition said he did so at the expense of democratic standards while enriching himself and his family.

    Kyrgyz army backs opposition government →

  • "I don't admit defeat in any way," Mr. Bakiyev said on the Ekho Moskvy radio station, but also recognized that "even though I am president, I don't have any real levers of power."

    Kyrgyz army backs opposition government →

Happening Now